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Cleveland Officers Not Immune from Excessive Force Lawsuit

Morning headlines for Friday, February 5, 2016: 

  • Cleveland officers not immune from excessive force lawsuit
  • Two men killed in separate train involved incidents in northeast Ohio
  • Retired Ohio police officer finally allowed to buy his K-9 partner
  • Ohio’s cities still have a long way to go before a full recovery from the great recession
  • Ohio company plays a big role in making the Super Bowl possible
  • Federal appeals court denies man’s request to shorten 50 year sentence for defrauding investors

 
Cleveland officers not immune from excessive force lawsuit

A federal appeals court in Cincinnati says two Cleveland police officers aren't immune from a lawsuit accusing them of excessive force in the apprehension of a teen with Down Syndrome. The decision on Thursday from the 6th U.S Circuit Court of Appeals in Cincinnati involves a lawsuit filed by Juan Ortiz and his family over an incident in 2010. The family says Officer Brian Kazimer slammed the 16-year-old against a vehicle and pinned him down for 15 minutes even though the officer later said the boy was trying to surrender. The lawsuit says another officer, Dan Crisan, watched but did nothing to intervene. The teen was let go soon after when the actual suspects were arrested.

Two men killed in separate train involved incidents in northeast Ohio
Police say two men have been killed in separate encounters with trains in northeast Ohio this week. Authorities say 51-year-old Anthony Nichols was killed Thursday morning when he drove his SUV around the crossing gate and it was hit by a speeding train in Barberton. On Wednesday afternoon in Canton, police say a man on the tracks was hit and killed by a train. Police say he may have been laying on the tracks. His name hasn't been released.

Retired Ohio police officer finally allowed to buy his K-9 partner
A recently retired Ohio police officer has been allowed to buy his K-9 partner for $1. Officials in Marietta had created a social-media stir when they said Matt Hickey's police dog, Ajax, had to be sold at auction because it was city property and could still work. Hickey and Ajax worked together for three years, and the dog lived with him. Earlier this week, the city had said it would allow Hickey to keep the dog if Hickey continued to work for the police department on a volunteer basis after his retirement. Hickey refused, noting he retired in January over health concerns.

Ohio’s cities still have a long way to go before a full recovery from the great recession
A new report by IHS Global Insight shows that it will still be a couple of years until Ohio’s cities recover all the jobs lost during the great recession. The report commissioned by the U.S. Conference of Mayors predicts Cleveland and Akron should be back to pre-recession employment by 2018. That’s a full decade after Akron and Cleveland lost more than 100,000 jobs. The reports shows Northeast Ohio cities are among the bottom ten of U.S. cities in job growth.

Ohio company plays a big role in making the Super Bowl possible
The footballs the Carolina Panthers and Denver Broncos will use in Sunday's Super Bowl come from right here in Ohio. The village of Ada is home to the Wilson Sporting Goods factory that makes footballs used by the NFL and other teams. The factory's 100-plus employees make 3,000 to 4,000 footballs daily. For this year's Super Bowl in Santa Clara, California, Wilson sent each team 108 footballs. They feature the Super Bowl 50 logo, team names, date and location.

Federal appeals court denies man’s request to shorten 50 year sentence for defrauding investors
A federal appeals court has rejected a former Indianapolis businessman's bid to shorten his 50-year sentence for defrauding investors of $200 million. The 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals affirmed Tim Durham's sentence this week. The court found it had already rejected Durham's earlier challenge to a calculation of losses due to his fraud that factored in his sentence. Durham was convicted in 2012 for operating a Ponzi scheme that defrauded thousands of investors in his Akron-based company, Fair Finance.