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During the past couple of weeks, the percentage of people testing positive for coronavirus has increased. And some doctors say they are seeing some other trends.

Pediatrician Rachael Morocco says she’s seeing more  children coming into her practice with COVID like symptoms.

“We’ve also seen an uptick in asymptomatic people who are also testing positive. In particular, we have seen mothers coming in for childbirth who are tested going into the hospital and are positive for no symptoms.”

Cleveland has seen a spike in new coronavirus cases in June, public health officials told city council on Monday.

For 103 new patients, initial symptoms trace back to the third week of June, according to a city health department presentation. That was a jump over the prior two weeks, but below symptom onset numbers for earlier in May.

The city reported 75 new cases on Sunday, the biggest daily increase in Cleveland's case count to date. Health Director Merle Gordon said those numbers were not reflected in her presentation to city council.

Gov. Mike DeWine (R-Ohio) says the state continues to see a concerning spike in cases of COVID-19. The governor says people must take social distancing seriously and wear masks before things get worse.

Gov. Mike DeWine announced that Ohio's nursing homes will be allowed to have outdoor visitors again, beginning July 20. It will be the first time in four months that many long-term care residents will be able to see family members in person.

Updated at 3:30 p.m. ET

The White House Coronavirus Task Force renewed calls for vigilance on Friday, acknowledging rising cases across Southern states and in parts of California.

The state health department is reporting the highest daily increase in total COVID-19 cases in Ohio since April. Gov. Mike DeWine (R-Ohio) says they're seeing what he calls a "worrisome" increase among a certain demographic.

Eighteen Northeast Ohio church congregations are joining forces to offer free, on-site COVID-19 testing.

In addition to getting more people tested, the effort also aims to address racial disparities in coronavirus response.

Greater Cleveland Congregations is launching the Color of Health Initiative, with an emphasis on the African American community and other higher-risk groups. The initiative is a partnership with the Cuyahoga County Board of Health and MetroHealth.

How Redlining, Racism Harm Black Americans' Health

Jun 24, 2020

Systemic racism has a huge impact on the health of Black Americans, and not just in the doctor’s office. In a Facebook Live event, Side Effects Public Media reporter Darian Benson spoke with three experts on topics ranging from generational mistrust to the impact of COVID-19. 

a photo of Charles Modlin with a patient
CLEVELAND CLINIC

By the end of this month, a group working to address the disproportionate affect COVID-19 has had on African-Americans in Ohio is expected to issue its final recommendations.

The Minority Health Strike Force was appointed by Governor Mike DeWine in April. Some have criticized how long it’s taken for these recommendations to come to fruition.

But one member of the group says it’s been taking its time to refine recommendations that are actionable. Dr. Charles Modlin is a surgeon and urologist at Cleveland Clinic who heads the Clinic’s Minority Men’s Health Center. He chairs the education and outreach subcommittee of the strike force. 

Gov. Mike DeWine (R-Ohio) says it is imperative for the state to ward off a spike of COVID-19 as the economy begins to reopen, one way of accomplishing that, according to DeWine, is to increase coronavirus testing.

The Infectious Diseases Society of America, one of the leading organizations in the U.S. for infectious disease management, released new guidelines for COVID-19 treatment and drugs being tested to treat the coronavirus.

Cleveland Clinic’s Dr. Adarsh Bhimraj, who led the panel that issued the revisions, said there is moderate evidence remdesivir, an antiviral medication, may be an effective treatment.

A photo of Cleveland Clinic in Strongsville.
GOOGLE EARTH

The coronavirus crisis has upended much of the economy, including the health care system.

Local hospitals saw a double financial hit from both the expense of ramping up the response along with the loss of revenue from elective surgery and other cancellations.

Thomas Campanella teaches the business of health care at Baldwin Wallace University.

Photo of a person vaping
LINDSAY FOX / WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

A new study by Cleveland Clinic Children’s finds that teens who regularly vape THC are likely to develop a serious condition associated with vaping known as EVALI, or e-cigarette or vaping product use-associated lung injury.

Since late last year, hospitals have seen a rise in the number of teens and adolescent patients seeking help for acute lung injury not only in Ohio but other parts of the country.   

Dr. Fariba Rezaee says teens who vape believe it is safer than smoking, which is part of the problem.

Yellow Springs is the first community in Ohio to require people to wear facemasks in public during the pandemic.

On Friday morning, Village Councilman Brian Housh was walking through downtown Yellow Springs, wearing a mask and putting up signs asking others to do the same.

“Our residents have made it really clear that they wanted more action taken,” Housh said. “And in light of spikes [in coronavirus cases] in Greene County and Montgomery County, this is something that’s not going away.”

The FDA has revoked permission for hydroxychloroquine to be used as a treatment for COVID-19, after the drug had been publicly touted by President Donald Trump. That leaves the state of Ohio with a stockpile of the drug amounting to millions of pills.

CLEVELAND CLINIC

Testing for coronavirus has become widespread in Ohio with pop-up stations and drive-through sampling sites.

Those labs use a nasal swab to test for an active case of COVID-19.

Another type of test is also becoming available.

It uses a blood sample to see if you may have already had the disease.

A Cleveland Clinic researcher says this antibody test is not something we should put much faith in.

The Ohio Senate is being asked to consider a bill passed along party lines in the House that requires new reporting standards for COVID19. 

Changes in daily life during the COVID-19 pandemic have disrupted people’s sleep routines, experts say. Dr. Carolyn Ievers-Landis, a clinical pediatric psychologist at UH Rainbow Babies & Children’s Hospital, said irregular sleep schedules can negatively affect health.

“People are having more delayed sleep,” she said. “Most people are able to sleep in a little bit later, and naturally, many people’s sleep is now later, which means they’re staying up later also.”

If your allergies are worse this season, you might blame it on the coronavirus pandemic.

University Hospitals allergist Dr. Sam Friedlander said it’s possible that allergies are worse now because people stayed home all spring to avoid the virus.

Friedlander said when people have new exposures to allergies, they have a dramatic increase in symptoms.

That means less time outside during the spring while people stayed home could have an impact.

A photo of Caitlyn Lenhoff, a masters student in computer science at Kent State University, demonstrating how to use the team's helmet based augmented reality system.
JIM MAXWELL / KENT STATE UNIVERSITY

A team of Kent State University students is working on an idea that could become part of NASA’s future missions to the moon and Mars.

a photo of a test kit
CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL AND PREVENTION

This week, entertainment venues across the state are reopening following three months of shut down due to the coronavirus pandemic. As things open back up, officials in Summit County want people to continue acting responsibly when it comes to preventing the spread of the disease.

a photo of antibody test kit
DANIELFOSTER437 / CREATIVE COMMONS

Ohio is now allowing nasal swab testing for anyone who might have COVID-19, not just those with severe symptoms.

Some labs are also offering a blood test for people who think they might have had a mild case of the disease.

This antibody test measures the body’s immune response to the coronavirus.

But the head of Cleveland Clinic’s coronavirus testing lab says these antibody tests are largely useless.

Ohio’s confirmed deaths from and cases of COVID-19 continue to inch up. Today there were 2,280 confirmed deaths and more than 37,500 confirmed cases. But as the pandemic continues, the state’s health department has now lost two of its top medical experts.

Dr. Amy Acton is stepping down from her role as the director of the Ohio Department of Health (ODH), Gov. Mike DeWine announced on Thursday. DeWine said she will now serve as his chief health advisor.

The director of the Ohio Department of Health, who drew national praise and criticism from some members of the state legislature for the state's pandemic shutdowns, has resigned.

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