Police Shot An Ohio Newspaper Owner. Now His Paper Is Going Out Of Business

Andy Grimm sits in a smoky, cramped newsroom in downtown New Carlisle. He’s antsy and nervous. Just as he seems to be getting comfortable, a Clark County Sheriff’s Deputy drives by. Grimm peers out the window and waits until the deputy is out of sight to continue talking.

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Ever wondered how a few companies — namely Coca-Cola and PesiCo — created multibillion-dollar empires marketing flavored sugar water?

Nutrition scholar Marion Nestle, one of the most dogged chroniclers of the U.S. food industry and its politics, did. She was intrigued by the power of Big Soda and how it's responding to flat sales in the U.S.

The latest clash in the cybersecurity vs. privacy debate played itself out in Congress on Tuesday when the Senate passed the Cybersecurity Information Sharing Act. Supporters say the bill, approved 74-21, will help stop hackers by getting companies that have been breached to share information about the embarrassing attack with federal law enforcement. The House passed its version in April.

Last year, Erin and Isaac Hougland of Indianapolis got certified to become foster parents, with the hope of adopting a baby. Just a few weeks later, they got a call.

An 8-week-old baby needed a home. All they knew was that the boy's mother was a heroin addict and had left him at the hospital. They were told that because of the drugs, the baby might require some special care. But mostly, he just needed a place to go.

"Both of us were just like, 'Let's do it,' " says Isaac Hougland. "We wrapped up what we were doing at work and went to the hospital."

While millions will watch the third Republican presidential debate on TV, just 1,000 people will get tickets to see the event in person in the massive Coors Events Center on the scenic University of Colorado campus in Boulder.

CNBC, the cable network sponsoring the debate, didn't respond to questions about why the 11,000-seat arena would remain mostly empty.

Ben Carson has surged into a lead in Iowa and is climbing nationally thanks to his appeal to evangelicals. But could his own beliefs as a Seventh-day Adventist make him anathema to many of those same voters?

Donald Trump seemed to question the Republican neurosurgeon's faith over the weekend.

"I'm Presbyterian," Trump said at a Saturday rally in Florida. "Boy, that's down the middle of the road, folks, in all fairness. I mean, Seventh-day Adventist, I don't know about. I just don't know about."

Lions are rapidly disappearing in large parts of Africa, and their population could be reduced by half outside of protected areas over the next two decades, according to a study published Tuesday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

After celebrating the U.S. women's national soccer team's 2015 FIFA World Cup victory at the White House today, veteran Abby Wambach, 35, announced plans to retire.

Wambach, who is the leading international scorer for both men and women, said she will step away from the game after the team's the final four games of thier victory tour. The match against China in New Orleans on Dec. 16 will be her last match.

In a speech to a meeting of police chiefs, President Obama defended the job of police departments across the country, called for tougher gun laws and said the United States criminal justice system needs reform.

It used to be that American Muslims who wanted a halal meal had to live in a major city and know a good butcher. Want to find an eligible spouse? Get your parents involved. In the market for halal cosmetics? Good luck.

Times are changing though.

It's an obscure provision of a relatively obscure law, overseen, rather unpredictably, by the Librarian of Congress.

A section in the country's copyright law known as the Digital Millennium Copyright Act prohibits unlocking of "access controls" (in simpler terms, breaking digital locks to dig around computer code) on various software.

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From NPR

The death toll from a tsunami that hit the Sunda Strait coastline of Indonesia over the weekend has risen to 429, according to authorities who issued new warnings on the grim anniversary of an earthquake and tsunami in 2004 that killed a staggering 230,000 people across 14 countries.

NPR's Julie McCarthy reports that relief operations continue for thousands of victims, including many who have lost their homes.

With no deal in sight to keep the government funded, hundreds of thousands of federal employees will either not be returning to work after holiday vacations or will be back on the job, but without pay.

President Trump reiterated Tuesday that he is in no mood to compromise over funding for his wall along the Southern border, and Democrats who oppose the measure are showing no signs of budging either.

While Santa Claus is relaxing at the North Pole after a very long day of delivering Christmas presents, there's no sign yet that his goodwill will be felt on Wall Street.

Investors and traders may still believe in a Santa Claus rally that would perk up financial markets. Such a boost usually pushes stock prices higher in the year's final week of trading.

U.S. markets are closed for Christmas, which means that investors can take a deep breath from this month's volatility. We'll zoom out and talk about the disconnect between plummeting stock prices and what's keeping our economy strong. Then: Consumer confidence is high, meaning stores are banking on a great holiday retail season. So why do retailers offer steeper discounts online than in-store? We'll do the numbers. Also on the show today: avocados. We've all heard tired jokes about millennials and avocados, but some are betting on the fruit to be more than just a food trend.

Two films open this week with titles that make them sound a lot sexier than they are: On the Basis of Sex, and Vice.

They're both biopics — Sex about a liberal Supreme Court Justice, Vice a conservative vice president. But they differ in ways that go far deeper than politics.

On The Basis Of Sex

You know exactly what you're getting from the opening moment, when a very young Ruth Bader Ginsberg (Felicity Jones) strides into Harvard Law School surrounded by a sea of grey, black, and navy business suits.

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