photo of Jamilya Maxwell
JAMILYA MAXWELL

This is Akron: City Faces Challenges Catching Up on Road Repairs

Jamilya Maxwell stuck her hand into the dirty water of a giant pothole in Highland Square a couple of weeks ago. It was wrist deep. Then she kneeled and spread her arms. But the pothole — in the shape of a giant, flopping goldfish — was wider. Her boyfriend, Cameron Blakey, took pictures and submitted a claim to the city for $163, the cost of a new tire on his 2011 Mercedes-Benz. “I love Akron," Maxwell said. "... We’re actually looking to move to Highland Square because it’s the only artsy...

Read More

Plain Dealer Announces 12 Additional Newsroom Layoffs

Mar 16, 2019

Plain Dealer President and Editor George Rodrigue announced Friday the paper will reduce its newsroom staff by an additional 12 people within two weeks. The PD announced in December it would lay off 24 union members and five managers when a new centralized page production system takes effect in May.

In a statement, Rodrigue called both moves a “necessity.”

ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Some Ohio legislators have been trying for years to add sexual orientation and gender identity or expression into the state’s anti-discrimination law. The bill, known as the “Ohio Fairness Act,” would make those additions a protected class in employment, housing and other public accommodations. 

Right now, a person in Ohio could be fired from their job, kicked out of their apartment, or refused service based on their sexual orientation, gender identity, or gender expression.  

Photo of President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump
LYDIA TAYLOR / WKSU

Here are your morning headlines for Friday, March 15:

'Fred's Diner Does Bacon' by Debra-Lynn Hook won first place in the juried competition at Summit Artspace
Debra-Lynn Hook / Summit Artspace

There are 419 square miles in Summit County. But how do you capture such a wide area in a single photography exhibit? On this week’s State of the Arts, WKSU’s Mark Arehart heads to Summit Artspace to find out.

Football is the image of extracurriculars in Ohio
ELVERT BARNES

An analysis of Ohio’s major public universities shows that the schools have been increasingly spending more to subsidize athletic programs, with a total of $186 million last year for ten schools, excluding Ohio State.  WKSU’s Kabir Bhatia spoke with Rich Exner, data analysis editor at Cleveland.com, about the trends he’s seeing in the numbers on athletic spending.

KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Gov. Mike DeWine has said repeatedly that mental health and drug addiction are two areas he’ll focus on in his first budget. The group that he appointed to study the needs in those areas has delivered him a report, just hours before that budget comes out. 

IanSkylake17 Shutterstock

In his State of the State speech last week, Gov. Mike DeWine proposed a new initiative intended to prioritize clean and safe water. 

He’s now giving more details about what he's calling the H-2-Ohio fund. It would become a permanent source of revenue for any challenges that comes the state’s way related to water quality.  

From harmful algal blooms to failing septic systems to lead contamination, Mike DeWine wants the state to be prepared for any water crisis that might come its way.

SUMMIT COUNTY SHERIFF'S DEPARTMENT / FACEBOOK.COM

For the first time ever, Summit County is offering full scholarships to attend the police academy for the Sheriff’s Office.

The academy starts in August and candidates who attend full time can complete the program by December. Inspector Bill Holland said there's a need for new people.

The city of Dayton has filed a lawsuit against an out-of-state group that plans to hold a rally on Dayton’s Courthouse Square in May. City officials say the Honorable Sacred Knights is a paramilitary group and the rally they are planning is in violation of Ohio’s constitution.

The U.S. Senate voted Thursday to terminate President Trump's declaration of a national emergency at the U.S.-Mexico border. Both of Ohio's senators, Sherrod Brown and Rob Portman, cast their votes in support of the measure.

Pages

SIGN UP FOR WKSU INSIGHT WEEKLY E-NEWSLETTER

_

From NPR

It may feel like the electric car has been crowned the future of transportation.
Auto companies have plans to make more electric car models, and sales — still only a tiny fraction of the overall market — are expected to get a boost as more countries pass regulations to reduce carbon emissions. But Japan isn't sure that the battery electric car is the only future, and it's betting big on something it says makes more sense in big cities: hydrogen fuel cell vehicles.

A decade ago, the U.S. government claimed that ditching paper medical charts for electronic records would make health care better, safer and cheaper.

Ten years and $36 billion later, the digital revolution has gone awry, an investigation by Kaiser Health News and Fortune magazine has found.

Veteran reporters Fred Schulte of KHN and Erika Fry of Fortune spent months digging into what has happened as a result. (You can read the cover story here.)

Across much of the Midwest, maternal and infant death rates are high—especially among African-Americans. So doctors, public health agencies and non-profit organizations are searching for solutions.

Among them is Sistering CU in Champaign-Urbana, Ill. It offers free home visits from trained volunteers to families with babies up to six months in age. It also recently launched a support group for new parents.


Updated at 5:44 p.m. ET

Darrell Blatchley received a call from the Philippines' Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources early Friday morning reporting that it had a young Cuvier's beaked whale that was weak and vomiting blood.

Within a few hours it was dead.

Blatchley, a marine biologist and environmentalist based in the Philippine city of Davao, gathered his team to drive two hours to where the whale had washed up.

Turkey and Iran launched a joint military operation against Kurdish militants along the the mutual border between the two countries on Monday, according to an announcement from the Turkish interior minister.

Turkey says the two unlikely allies — one a NATO member, the other a target of U.S. sanctions — have joined forces to target a common enemy: the Kurdistan Worker's Party or PKK, which the U.S., Turkey and others consider to be a terrorist group.

More from NPR