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Morning Headlines: ‘The Devil Strip’ Faces $100K Debt, Uncertain Path Forward; Roller Derby Team Sues Over Guardians Name

Issues of the Devil Strip magazine.
DEREK KREIDER
/
THE DEVIL STRIP INSTAGRAM
The remaining members of The Devil Strip’s board shed more light on its financial troubles during a meeting for co-op members Wednesday night. The board said the paper is $100,000 in debt to vendors, the government, and creditors. Co-op members have until the end of the month to vote on whether to fold or choose a path forward.

Here are your morning headlines for Thursday, October 28:

  • ‘The Devil Strip’ faces $100K debt, uncertain path forward
  • Roller derby team sues over Guardians name
  • Akron hosts public forums on COVID relief spending
  • Bill: Doctors must care for babies born alive after abortion
  • Jury acquits man, 83, imprisoned 45 years for wife's death
  • Aisha’s Law passes the House

‘The Devil Strip’ faces $100K debt, uncertain path forward
(WKSU) -- The remaining members of The Devil Strip’s board shed more light on its financial troubles during a meeting for co-op members Wednesday night. The Akron arts and culture magazine abruptly laid off its staff last week citing insufficient funds. The board said the paper is $100,000 in debt to vendors, the government, and creditors. They say it’s not yet known whether the debt accrued under founder Chris Horne or under the co-op that took over ownership last year. Horne stepped away on sabbatical last month. The board said there is no evidence of criminal wrongdoing. Co-op members have until the end of the month to vote on whether to fold or choose a path forward. The next meeting is on November 17th.

Roller derby team sues over Guardians name
(AP) — A Cleveland-area roller derby team that has called itself the Guardians since 2013 is suing Cleveland's newly renamed Major League Baseball team to stop it from using the Guardians name. The Cleveland Indians announced in July it would change the team's name to Guardians for the 2022 season after years of criticism that the name and Chief Wahoo logo was racist. The roller derby team in a lawsuit filed Wednesday in federal court in Cleveland says the baseball team changed the name despite knowing the roller derby team was using it. The Indians in a statement said team officials don't think there's a conflict.

Akron hosts public forums on COVID relief spending
(WKSU) -- Akron residents can take part in two public information sessions about the city’s federal COVID relief funds. Mayor Dan Horrigan has outlined his proposal for spending $145 million focusing on areas of violence prevention, housing, utilities, healthcare, parks and public spaces and stabilizing the budget. A dashboard on the city’s website will provide details about specific projects. Zoom sessions will be held Thursday at noon and 6 p.m. Both will be live-streamed on Akron City Council’s YouTube channel. Residents can also submit their own ideas through an online form.

Bill: Doctors must care for babies born alive after abortion
(AP) — The GOP-controlled Ohio Senate has approved legislation that would require doctors to report cases of babies born alive after abortions or attempted abortions. The bill requires the state Department of Health to create a child survival form to be submitted to the agency. The legislation passed Wednesday also makes it a crime to fail to preserve the health or life of a baby born alive. In cases of procedures in abortion clinics, the proposal requires doctors to provide care to a baby born alive, call 911 and arrange transportation to a hospital. The bill also bans abortion clinics from working with doctors who teach at state-funded hospitals and medical schools.

Jury acquits man, 83, imprisoned 45 years for wife's death
(AP) — A jury in Cleveland has acquitted an 83-year-old man who had spent 45 years in prison after being convicted at his first trial of killing his wife. Isiah Andrews was released from prison last year after a judge reversed his conviction in the 1974 slaying of his wife. The judge ruled prosecutors at his 1975 trial failed to disclose information about another suspect who died in 2011. The Ohio Innocence Project took up Andrews' case in 2015.

Aisha’s Law passes the House
(Statehouse News Bureau) -- The Ohio House has passed legislation that aims to protect domestic violence victims. The bill is named after Aisha Fraser of Shaker Heights, who was murdered in 2018 by her ex-husband, former Cuyahoga County Common Pleas judge and state lawmaker Lance Mason. The legislation requires police responding to a domestic violence call to perform a screening to determine whether a victim is at risk for murder. It would also make strangulation a domestic violence crime. Aisha’s law was reintroduced after it passed the House last year but stalled in a Senate committee.