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What People Are Asking About The Impeachment Inquiry

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

With the start of public hearings next week, the American people will get a chance to hear directly from witnesses at the heart of the impeachment inquiry for the first time. So far, not everyone has been paying attention. We found that out when we sent a team of producers out to the streets of Washington, D.C., to ask people what questions they might have about the inquiry.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

MICHAEL WENTWORTH: Yeah. I'm just curious about what's going to happen - I mean, there's mounting, mounting evidence - and see if Trump can somehow get out of all this bad news - which, in the past, he seems to have done. So I'm concerned about that.

BARBARA RAMSEY: We don't really follow the - anything. So I don't know.

JOE CABRERA: Why can't they work together? Why do they have to be in party lines?

ROSS BEAMISH: Is it really the most important thing that our elected officials could be doing for us?

BECKY BEAMISH: I don't like the fact that they - that it was private, that Trump didn't have a chance to defend himself. I didn't like the Democrats doing that. But I guess they're going to change that, so that's good.

LEON PRICE: I'm kind of curious about what happens next, but I don't know about what the process is or what the next step is.

MARTIN: That was Leon Price sharing his thoughts on the impeachment inquiry. Before him, we also heard from Michael Wentworth, Becky and Ross Beamish, Joe Cabrera and Barbara Ramsey - a small and, yes, unscientific survey of people on the streets of Washington, D.C., this past week. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.