a photo of the University of Akron polymer building
JEFF ST.CLAIR / WKSU

How the University of Akron's Flagship Polymer Program Survived the School's Restructuring

The University of Akron is undergoing unprecedented challenges as it struggles to close a $65 million budget gap. Its response includes a radical redesign of the school’s academic structure. What will it mean for the future of Akron’s flagship polymer program?

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The Customer Is Always Right. Except When They Won't Wear A Mask

They fume and rage and demand their rights. Sometimes they even get violent. In the age of COVID-19, most people practice social distancing guidelines when they go into stores and restaurants, putting on masks and standing 6 feet behind other customers. Still, there are the nightmare customers — those who refuse to comply. "I've had a lot of conflict. I've had a lot of pushback from people," says Brenda Leek, owner of Curbside Eatery in La Mesa, Calif. One woman entered Leek's restaurant...

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Akron mayor Dan Horrigan wears a mask at a June 6 protest.
SUSAN ZAKE / KSU COLLABORATIVE NEWS LAB

Here are your morning headlines for Tuesday, July 14:

a photo of the University of Akron polymer building
JEFF ST.CLAIR / WKSU

The University of Akron is undergoing unprecedented challenges as it struggles to close a $65 million budget gap.

Its response includes a radical redesign of the school’s academic structure.

What will it mean for the future of Akron’s flagship polymer program?

Craft beer has been a growing part of Ohio’s economy, but the pandemic struck bars and restaurants hard.

Some of Akron’s largest craft brewers have weathered the situation well, and how they’ve done it may be a model for others. 

Akronym Brewery in Akron found a way to expand its services during the pandemic. General Manager Joey Greising said Akronym started offering food on its menu and added three more employees because of increased business.

A photo of the Centering Pregnancy Group
KELLY WOODWARD / WKSU

Summit County is channeling another two-and-a-half million dollars toward the centering groups that advocates say are one key to saving babies’ lives. The issue disproportionately impacts Blacks, who have an infant mortality rate more than twice as high as those of non-Hispanic whites. We visit one of the circles of expectant parents receiving extra support.

 

"I want you to use your thighs to stand up, and we still got our Kegels tight. Come on. Stand up.”

 

A conservative think tank has filed a lawsuit against the city of Columbus and the state of Ohio, claiming that its employees who live outside of Columbus shouldn’t have paid city income taxes while working during the state’s stay at home order.

A group of children services experts from around Ohio are putting together recommendations to improve the system. They say their mission must keep moving forward even as the COVID-19 pandemic continues.

Ohio coronavirus dashboard for July 12, 2020.
OHIO DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

Here are your morning headlines for Monday, July 13:

photo of Dolli Quattrocchi-Gold
KABIR BHATIA / WKSU

The faculty union at the University of Akron rallied over the weekend to ask for support of what they feel should be the school’s core mission: education. They’re concerned about efforts to plug a $65 million budget shortfall that could deeply impact teaching positions. And they argue that the university spends too much on athletics.

a photo of Dan Horrigan with a mask on.
SUSAN ZAKE / KSU COLLABORATIVE NEWS LAB

Akron officials are moving forward on a plan to prevent the spread of COVID-19 by making masks mandatory in the city and setting fines for offenders.

Masks became mandatory in Summit County Friday after the state moved it into red alert status

Mayor Dan Horrigan said the city’s ordinance has been in the works since March.

a photo of the Boardman Library sign
SARAH TAYLOR / WKSU

As some Ohio libraries re-open, others are scaling back or reversing their plans in the face of an increasing number of coronavirus cases.

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From NPR

Florida posted its highest number of deaths yet from the coronavirus Tuesday. The state's Department of Health reported 132 deaths and 9,194 new positive cases.

It followed two days when Florida registered its highest number of new COVID-19 cases. On Sunday, Florida saw 15,300 cases, the most so far by any state.

Updated at 12:40 p.m. ET

Federal prosecutors have charged a former nursing assistant at a medical center for veterans in West Virginia with seven counts of second-degree murder.

Reta Mays, who worked at the Louis A. Johnson Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Clarksburg, is accused of killing seven patients by injecting them with insulin. She is also charged with assault with intent to commit murder regarding an eighth patient.

Anton Besenko is worried. He fears all the hard-won progress made in fighting the AIDS epidemic is on a collision course with the urgent needs of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Civil liberties advocates are urging Attorney General William Barr to name a special prosecutor to investigate possible violations of protesters' rights during the June 1 crackdown in Lafayette Square in Washington, D.C., NPR has learned.

Federal officers deployed tear gas, rubber bullets, pepper spray and smoke canisters to scatter the mostly peaceful group of demonstrators, clearing the way for President Trump to pose for pictures in front of the historic St. John's Episcopal Church.

Updated at 12:45 p.m. ET

The dramatic collapse of the U.S. economy from the coronavirus is pummeling America's largest banks, raising new concerns about how much growth is slowing.

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