a photo of chapel hill mall
ROSALIE MURPHY / THE DEVIL STRIP

Here are your morning headlines for Friday, Jan. 17:

photo of Sen. Sherrod Brown
C-SPAN

When former President Bill Clinton was impeached in 1998, Senator Sherrod Brown was a representative in the U.S. House. Now as a Senator, he’ll be a juror in the trial of President Trump—deciding whether the impeached president should be removed from office.

Brown says the process has been much different this time.

Lake Erie Slow To Freeze Over, Bringing Potential Erosion

Jan 16, 2020

Mild temperatures so far this winter could have a lasting impact on Lake Erie’s shoreline. Late ice formation on the lake can cause even more erosion, according to scientists.

Despite a cold November, temperatures this winter have remained mostly mild. Lake Erie’s water temperatures are hovering in the mid-thirties — not cold enough to freeze.

photo of Nick Browning, Nicole Hughes, Jacqueline Silas-Butler
KABIR BHATIA / WKSU

Akron Public Schools is forming a new partnership with Huntington Bank for the district’s latest College & Career Academy.

A stock photo of stethoscope and chart.
PIXABAY

Here are your morning headlines for Thursday, Jan. 16:

photo of maureen corcoran
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The director of Ohio Medicaid says her agency is dealing with big problems and could face huge fines from the federal government if they’re not fixed. And she’s pointing to the administration of former Gov. John Kasich for creating and not handling those mistakes. 

The memo is scathing. Medicaid director Maureen Corcoran uses words such as “inadequate”, “unacceptable”, “poorly implemented” and a “mess” to describe what she inherited after being appointed by former Gov. John Kasich’s fellow Republican and successor Mike DeWine.

OPERS board sitting at a table discussing health care assitance meeting
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Thousands of retirees in the state's largest pension fund will see changes to their health care benefits. The leaders of the Members of the Ohio Public Employees Retirement System have voted to change the way retirees receive health care, and a portion of those would have to find their own plan. 

The change eliminates what's known as the group plan for OPERS retirees under 65 and will instead give them a stipend for their own plan.

Retirees over the age of 65 on Medicare will receive less aid intended to fill in the gaps in coverage.

a photo of a trailer of soybeans
NATHAN REINECK / WKSU

A Portage County farmer welcomes the signing of a trade agreement with China Wednesday. The truce asks China to respect intellectual property laws in exchange for the U.S. reducing some tariffs.

The first phase of the trade agreement is the starting point of recovery for many Ohio corn and soybean farmers who were impacted most by the trade war.

Amazon has started hiring more than 1,500 workers for a new distribution center in West Jefferson. 

Cuyahoga County may make it easier for employees to report whistleblower complaints within county government.

County council gave a first reading to revised reporting safeguards Monday evening.

Councilman Dale Miller, a Democrat who introduced the measure, said it grew out of talks with county Inspector General Mark Griffin. The changes are intended to give potential whistleblowers more comfort in coming forward with complaints, Miller said.

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From NPR

A quiet New England community west of Hartford, Conn. has found itself roped into the impeachment saga with the emergence of an improbable character in the ongoing Ukraine scandal: Robert Hyde.

Hyde is a 40-year-old congressional candidate and former landscaper in Simsbury, Conn., who is known for being brash, foul-mouthed and for hitching his candidacy on his fervent support for President Trump.

The White House's legal team has called the House impeachment process "highly partisan and reckless," in a forceful response to the summons issued last week by Majority Leader Mitch McConnell ahead of President Trump's Senate impeachment trial, which begins next Tuesday.

The White House released its formal response to the summons sent by the Senate last week, a procedural part of the impeachment process ahead of the trial that begins on Tuesday.

"The articles of impeachment submitted by House Democrats are a dangerous attack on the right of the American people to freely choose their president," the White House's response says. "This is a brazen and unlawful attempt to overturn the results of the 2016 election and interfere with the 2020 election."

House impeachment managers released their formal response to the summons sent by the Senate last week, a procedural part of the impeachment process ahead of the trial that begins on Tuesday.

"President Trump's conduct is the Framers' worst nightmare," they said in the brief released Saturday.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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