a photo of poet Nina Gibans
MARK AREHART / WKSU

State of the Arts: Poet and Photographer Bridge Age Gap in New Book on Growing Older

"In the Garden of Old Age" is a reflection on love, friendship and finding peace. The book is a collaboration between an older writer and a young photographer. On this week's State of the Arts, we sit down with the book's creators.

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WKSU NEWS SERIES: REDUCE REUSE REFOCUS

Reduce Reuse Refocus: A Recycling Guide for Northeast Ohio

We heard it from you time and again. "Why can't I find one place where I can get what I need to know about recycling in my city, my village, my township?" We looked. We couldn't find one either. As part of our series, Reduce Reuse Refocus , we decided to build one for you.

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View of Lake Erie
Jeff St. Clair / WKSU

Here are your morning headlines for Friday, Feb. 28:

a photo of poet Nina Gibans
MARK AREHART / WKSU

"In the Garden of Old Age" is a reflection on love, friendship and finding peace. The book is a collaboration between an older writer and a young photographer. On this week's State of the Arts, we sit down with the book's creators.

a photo of Paolo DeMaria
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

State testing season in Ohio’s schools takes place in the spring. And next week, the state school superintendent and the Ohio Department of Education will set minimum scores for students to show competency in Algebra 1 and English II – but they won’t be required to be proficient. 

Precipitation Exacerbates Erosion in Geneva on the Lake

15 hours ago
photo of Lake Erie
JEFF ST. CLAIR / WKSU

Geneva-on-the-Lake lost five to six feet of lakefront land Wednesday. Precipitation and high water levels are exacerbating the town’s erosion problems where 45 feet of land had already washed into Lake Erie earlier this month.

Geneva-on-the-Lake and Township Park officials met this week to discuss permit applications to the Ohio Department of Natural Resources and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Those permits would allow for the construction of erosion defenses.

The federal government estimates nearly 1 million children under the age of 5 went uncounted in the 2010 U.S. Census.

photo of dave yost
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Ohio Attorney General Dave Yost is rolling out a new training program geared towards teaching law enforcement and officials how to assess potential risks of violence at schools.

The Ohio School Threat Assessment Training is a 3-hour course available for free to anyone who wants to learn more about preventing school violence.

The assessment should help teachers, school administrators, and law enforcement identify people of concern, assess their risk of violence or harm, and create intervention strategies.

A photo of Mihaljevic from the State of the Clinic address
YU KWAN LEE / CLEVELAND CLINIC CENTER FOR MEDICAL ART & PHOTOGRAPHY

Cleveland Clinic’s CEO painted a rosy financial picture for the global health care organization during his state of the Clinic address Wednesday. The hospital system is growing in facilities, patients and revenue.

Clinic President Dr. Tom Mihaljevic says operating income increased by 47% in 2019 over the previous year to $390 million.

Mihaljevic attributed the financial rebound to the clinic's ability to bring in more patients.

A photo of Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Gov. Mike DeWine is doubling down on his commitment to renew education funding for student wellness programs. The state invested hundreds of millions of dollars towards what are known as wraparound services in last year's budget.

DeWine says those programs can play a vital role in a student's education. 

The two-year state budget sends $675 million to Ohio's school districts for mentoring, mental health treatment, and other wraparound services that address student issues outside of the classroom.

Photo of President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump
LYDIA TAYLOR / WKSU

Here are your morning headlines for Thursday, Feb. 27:

photo of Tim Ryan, Ray Mancini
KABIR BHATIA / WKSU

A lot of people are looking to understand the forces that may be at work in this year’s presidential election. Author David Giffels believes Ohio holds the key to that. For his next book, he’s been travelling the state on his own listening tour.

This month, To Understand Ohio, we spent some time talking with Giffels about Congressman Tim Ryan’s short-lived bid for the White House, what that says about the Mahoning Valley and how that relates to the rest of the country.

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From NPR

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Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

When primary voters go to the polls in South Carolina on Saturday, they'll be the first in the nation to use all-new voting equipment. It's one of about a dozen states replacing all or most of their voting machines this year, in part because of security concerns after Russian interference in the 2016 election.

South Carolina officials are eager to emphasize the reliability of their state's equipment following the Iowa caucuses debacle, where a flawed app delayed the reporting of accurate results for weeks.

As Tuesday's Democratic presidential primary debate came to a close, each of the candidates was asked to name the biggest misconception voters have about them.

A day later, the question was still on the mind of Tom Steyer, the billionaire hedge fund investor who has barnstormed South Carolina, aggressively courting the black vote with a focus on racial justice and climate issues.

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