photo of Jay Corrigan
JEFF ST.CLAIR / WKSU

How Much Money Would It Take For You To Give Up Facebook?

How do you measure the value of something that’s free? It’s a challenge for economists who study the economic impact of the Internet revolution. In this week’s Exploradio, we look at research that puts a price on your network of virtual friends. How much would someone need to pay you for you to stop using Facebook?

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More than 500 members of Wright State’s chapter of the American Association of University Professors are set to walk off the job Tuesday unless a contract deal is reached before then. The strike is the culmination of more than two years of failed contract negotiations.

Photo of Rep. John Becker
OHIO PUBLIC TV

State and local elected officials are getting a raise thanks to a law passed last month. At least one legislator says he plans to give the amount of the raise away to charity because of the way it came about.

The raise was attached to a bill hiking death benefits for survivors of first responders, which became law after Gov. John Kasich’s veto was overridden. Republican Representative John Becker of Cincinnati called the process shameless and voted against the bill and the veto override. 

The winners of this year's state oratory contest got a bit political in their speeches, referencing the Flint water crisis, police-involved shootings and NFL players kneeling during the National Anthem.

Foster Care and Adoption website (credit Ohio Department of Job and Family Services)

Ohio has nearly 16,000 children in the custody of county children’s services agencies. Gov. Mike DeWine has indicated he wants to increase the number of foster care families available to meet that need, and one effort is getting underway.  

Video of students at Covington Catholic High School went viral this weekend.  They were in Washington D. C. for the March for Life.  While there, they had an interaction with a Native American man participating in the march near the Lincoln Memorial.  The story of what exactly happened has been evolving all weekend. WVXU News Director Maryanne Zeleznik talked with new Cincinanti Edition Host, Michael Monks, who is also the editor of River City News,cabout what happened.

a photo of Jeff Kaiser from Haven of Rest Ministries
SARAH TAYLOR / WKSU

Bitter cold weather can be the worst for those who have no home. One of Akron's homeless shelters is doing what it can to help them. 

"Right now the men are on overflow," said Jeff Kaiser, executive director of Haven of Rest Ministries."

Haven of Rest has 100 beds for male guests. Its facility for women and children, Harvest Home, can normally accommodate 59. Kaiser said they're currently serving about 230 people. 

"Any time we get a cold spell like this we’re always prepared for the extra amount of people."

The head of the Ohio realtors' association says the partial shutdown of the federal government is making it harder for prospective homebuyers to get a loan. 

When it comes to financing a home purchase, roughly 1-in-5 buyers rely on the help of an FHA loan, which is basically a mortgage that's insured by the Federal Housing Administration. But since the partial government shutdown went into effect, delays in the approval process are starting to stack up, said Anjanette Frye, President of Ohio REALTORS.

photo of snowy landscape outside of WKSU studios
ANDREW MEYER / WKSU

Here are your headlines for Monday, January 21, 2019:

photo of Jay Corrigan
JEFF ST.CLAIR / WKSU

How do you measure the value of something that’s free?

It’s a challenge for economists who study the economic impact of the Internet revolution.

In this week’s Exploradio, we look  at research that puts a price on your network of virtual friends.

How much would someone need to pay you for you to stop using Facebook?

A sign advertising SNAP acceptance.
JONATHAN WEISS / SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

Summit County’s Department of Job and Family Services is encouraging people-in-need to apply for SNAP benefits by the end of the month – and that now includes federal employees affected by the government shutdown.

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From NPR

Britain's prime minister, Theresa May, faced hours of blistering criticism on Monday from more than 100 lawmakers who questioned her leadership a week after Parliament decisively rejected her plan for leaving the European Union and mounted a failed effort to unseat her through a vote of no confidence.

May struggled to bring new ideas to parliament with just two months to go until the March 29 deadline for the United Kingdom to leave the European Union.

"Good will is slipping away, as well as time," said Rupa Huq, a member of parliament from the Labour Party.

A leading Nicaraguan journalist has left the country following a police raid on his newsroom last month.

Carlos Fernando Chamorro, editor of the online publication Confidencial, announced on Sunday that he has gone into exile in Costa Rica, citing suppression of independent press under Nicaraguan President Daniel Ortega.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Stephanie Clayton won her fourth term in the Kansas legislature as a moderate Republican but when she started in office this month, she did so as a Democrat. She says she had an abrupt change of heart about a month after the November election last year.

It was the day Republican legislative leaders said they wanted to rewrite a school-finance bill that Clayton and other moderate Republicans had worked alongside Democrats to pass in last year's session. For her, it was a breaking point.

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