JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

DeWine: 'There Is Racism in Ohio and Across the Country'

Gov. Mike DeWine dedicated most of his press conference about the coronavirus Tuesday to discussing racism in the state.

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JANICE CHANG / FOR NPR

Telehealth Services Offer Some Surprising Advantages. OH Really?

Businesses in Ohio are re-opening and schools are making plans for this fall. But you’ve still got questions about the future of telemedicine, and when and how libraries will reopen amid the coronavirus pandemic. We answer those questions and more in this week’s edition of “ OH Really? ”

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an image of the Statue of Liberty with a face mask
BIGSTOCK

Here’s something that might surprise you: A new national survey shows that regardless of political affiliation, Americans mostly agree on how to reopen the economy during the coronavirus pandemic—slowly—and with protective measures like face masks.

Indiana, for example, is currently in “phase 3” of its “Indiana Back on Track” plan, allowing for gatherings of up to 100 people who follow social distancing guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Gov. Mike DeWine dedicated most of his press conference about the coronavirus Tuesday to discussing racism in the state. 

The Cleveland Public Library was scheduled to reopen to the public Monday for limited services. But staff have been instructed not to report to the Main Library, Sterling or Carnegie West branches due to the curfew order by Mayor Frank Jackson affecting downtown to W. 25th St.

Phone lines at all other locations are open Monday for calls regarding holds, reference questions and general inquiries. Materials currently checked out can be returned, and will be quarantined for 72 hours before being recirculated.

Cleveland City Council’s Health and Human Services Committee met Monday to pass a resolution declaring racism as an issue of public health.

The resolution was introduced earlier this year as a way to support and promote policies to address infant mortality and access to health care, as well as seek solutions to racial health disparities.

Urban League of Greater Cleveland President and CEO Marsha Mockabee said these issues have always been relevant, but it’s even more meaningful to have the conversation as protests against police brutality take place across the country.  

Cleveland Mayor Frank Jackson has extended the curfew in Downtown Cleveland until 8 p.m. June 2. It was set to expire Monday at 8 a.m., but Sunday night, the mayor issued the extension. He also expanded the curfew zone to include the Market District on Cleveland’s Near West Side. No vehicles or pedestrians are permitted in these areas. Ward 3 Cleveland City Councilman Kerry McCormack represents the Downtown, Ohio City and Tremont neighborhoods.

Business Owners In Cleveland Question Curfew Restrictions

5 hours ago

Business owners in Downtown Cleveland and Ohio City are raising concerns about whether a lengthy lockdown in the aftermath of Saturday’s protest against the death of George Floyd is necessary.

Just off of West 25th Street in Ohio City, Michael Kaplan had the doors of the Glass Bubble Project, his glass studio and shop, open on Monday morning while all the other businesses on this usually busy commercial strip were closed.

“I’m an artist, so where else would I go?” Kaplan said.

Updated: 8:20 a.m., Tuesday, June 2, 2020

Wearing masks and speaking to jailed defendants by videoconference, judges on Monday began hearing the cases of the dozens of people arrested during the weekend’s demonstrations in Downtown Cleveland.

Defendants face charges including aggravated riot, breaking and entering and failure to comply with a police officer’s orders. Most of those arraigned Monday received personal bonds, allowing them to leave jail without putting down any money.

The leader of minority Democrats in the Ohio House says it’s time to take recommendations and reports on community policing off the shelf and put them in action. 

photo of Emilia Sykes
Andy Chow / Statehouse News Bureau

Here are your morning headlines for Tuesday, June 2:

a photo illustration of a telehealth visit
JANICE CHANG / FOR NPR

Businesses in Ohio are re-opening and schools are making plans for this fall. But you’ve still got questions about the future of telemedicine, and when and how libraries will reopen amid the coronavirus pandemic.

We answer those questions and more in this week’s edition of “OH Really?

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From NPR

North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper, a Democrat, said Tuesday that it's "very unlikely" the state can permit a packed Republican National Convention in Charlotte to go forward this summer.

"The people of North Carolina do not know what the status of COVID-19 will be in August, so planning for a scaled-down convention with fewer people, social distancing and face coverings is a necessity," Cooper wrote Republican National Committee Chairwoman Ronna McDaniel.

Malika Dahir, a Somali American and mother of three in Minneapolis desperately needed an outlet to talk about George Floyd’s killing and everything that has happened since.

Floyd is a black man who was killed by a white Minneapolis police officer who knelt on his neck for nearly nine minutes. His death has sparked protests and riots in the Twin Cities and around the world.

Climate change has put organisms on the move. In her new book, The Next Great Migration, Science writer Sonia Shah writes about migration — and the ways in which outmoded notions of "belonging" have been used throughout history to curb what she sees as a biological imperative.

There is a tendency to view plants, animals and people who cross into a new territory as a threat to the current habitat. But Shah says there's another way to think about these "invaders."

Senate Republicans have launched politically loaded investigations into the Obama administration and presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden that are expected to carry on into the fall.

On Wednesday, the Senate Judiciary Committee begins the first of a planned series of hearings on the origins of the FBI's 2016 Russia investigation into possible ties with the Trump campaign. Republicans are particularly interested in the decision-making inside the Obama-Biden administration.

Piece by piece, authorities overnight began pulling down a five-story-tall monument to Confederate troops that has stood for more than a century in Birmingham, Ala.

By the time the workers paused Tuesday morning, little was left of a spire that had become a lightning rod for controversy in recent years and a focal point for local protesters outraged by George Floyd's death last week in Minneapolis.

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