The Entrepreneur Beat

Credit BREANNA MCCRYSTAL / WKSU

WKSU undertakes a year-long examination of entrepreneurship in Northeast Ohio with a 360-degree look at business creation in the region and examine the resources available to start-ups, the opportunities, and pitfalls in the local business climate. The project includes long-form features as part of WKSU's ongoing Exploradio series as well as entrepreneurship-themed news reports.

The Entrepreneurship Beat is produced with generous support from the Burton D. Morgan Foundation. Burton D. Morgan Foundation champions the entrepreneurial spirit, contributes to a robust entrepreneurial ecosystem, and leads in the burgeoning field of entrepreneurship education. Read more about the project HERE.

Ways to Connect

Photo of logo for "Hack N Akron"
Launch League

The city of Akron hopes to find a new way of solving some of its problems by partnering with a local startup accelerator. Launch League’s annual “Hack N Akron” brings together inventors, entrepreneurs and tech experts.

Akron Deputy Chief of Staff Annie McFadden says the group will work together on data entry, neighborhood branding and a more streamlined reservation system for the city’s learning centers.

FEDERAL RESERVE BANK OF CLEVELAND

A new report finds that minority-owned businesses have a more difficult time getting credit from lenders than companies with white owners.

Photo of board game
Simon Denny

Business students from Case Western Reserve University’s Weatherhead School of Management aren’t consulting with a top business executive this week; they're consulting with an artist. WKSU’s Jeff St. Clair reports.

Contemporary artist Simon Denny will be working with Case Western Reserve and Cleveland Institute of Art students this week at the creative space think[box] to talk about business creation from a different perspective.

Photo of one of VR Rage's indoor signs
Reid Smith

A new bar in Northeast Ohio is putting a fresh spin on virtual reality. VR Rage in Parma gives customers a chance to play virtual reality games while enjoying food and drink.

Owner Tom Jenkins says virtual reality isn’t just for kids.

“It’s endless -- the possibilities and the number of layers to this. We’ve only got 14 games so far, and these various machines, but there is a whole series of possibilities moving forward,” Jenkins says.

Photo of Jonathan Maletic
Kent State University

A Kent State University computer-science professor has received a $300,000 grant from the National Science Foundation to further his development of eye-tracking software.

Jonathan Maletic will work with Youngstown State University professor Bonita Sharif on their project, iTrace.

Current technology tracks where viewers’ eyes range on a webpage but doesn’t accommodate scrolling or switching from one page to another, a problem iTrace aims to fix.

Maletic expects his project will help researchers better understand how computer scientists scan lines of code.

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