opioids

DIMITRIS KALOGEROPOYLOS / FLICKR

Cuyahoga County Council has approved an additional $200,000 for this year’s medical examiners budget to deal with the rising number of fatal opioid overdoses.

photo of Ohio Youth Government and Gov. John Kasich
STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Students from around the state who are participating in the YMCA’s “Youth in Government” program went to the Ohio Statehouse today. Gov. John Kasich met with the group.

photo of Teresa Long
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Some of the biggest players in the fight against Ohio’s opioid abuse told business leaders that the epidemic might be closer than they think and warned them to be prepared.

The top health official in Columbus wants everyone to have Naloxone. City Health Commissioner Teresa Long says many people might brush off the overdose-reversing drug as something only addicts or their family or friends should have.

Long warned during a Columbus Metropolitan Club forum that anyone could be in a position to have to save a life.

photo of Hackett, Edwards, Weidle and Householder
STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Ohio lawmakers are pushing a bill they think will reduce opioid overdose deaths by setting prescribing guidelines for doctors and dentists.

Every day in Ohio, eight people die from opioid overdoses, according to the latest data from the Ohio Department of Health. And each day, 84 infants are treated for drug withdrawal in Ohio hospitals. Some Republicans are hoping a bill they are sponsoring will lower those numbers.

photo of Jerry Craig
KABIR BHATIA / WKSU

Summit County says its new program to reach out to people within days of an overdose is getting increasing support from cities within the county.

Since December, the Alcohol, Drug Addiction and Mental Health Services Board has seen several cities create quick response teams consisting of a police officer, paramedic and counselor who will reach out to people within three to five days of an overdose.

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