Ohio Environmental Council

A photo of the Everett Covered Bridge. It crosses Furnace Run in Ohio's Cuyahoga Valley National Park.
KENNETH KEIFER / SHUTTERSTOCK

Environmental advocates say time is running out to save a federal fund that helps improve local parks, pools, and playgrounds. 

For decades the Land and Water Conservation Fund has given a boost to improvement projects. They range in size from as small as parking lots for local swimming pools to as large as millions of dollars in improvements for the Cuyahoga Valley National Park and Wayne National Forest.

Ricardo Granados of the Ohio Environmental Council says, whether they know it or not, many Ohioans have likely benefited from this fund.

photo of PUCO
JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The agency that regulates public utilities has a new plan for modernization of aging electricity grids.

Public Utilities Commission of Ohio Chairman Asim Haque said its new PowerForward plan is a comprehensive roadmap that will be used as electricity companies upgrade infrastructure.

He said the plan ensures grid security and the ability to adapt to future power usage, and it gives customers options.

photo of dark money
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Now that they’ve had success in changing the way the maps for lawmakers at the state and federal level are drawn, Ohio activists who worked on those ballot issues are turning their attention to other concerns.

Jen Miller from the League of Women Voters of Ohio says the Congressional redistricting issue that passed in the primary is still top of mind for her group.

photo of natural gas drilling pad
DAVID GAYLOR / SHUTTERSTOCK

The state budget director is pushing back on a bill that environmental advocates and the oil and gas industry say would streamline the process of capping some 600 old oil and gas wells that don’t have owners. The bill would also triple the amount of money set aside to cap those wells. 

James St. John / creativecommons.org

An environmental group and an oil and gas industry lobbying group are both praising a bill that passed the Ohio House that would streamline the process of capping some 600 old, unused wells that don’t have owners. Statehouse correspondent Karen Kasler reports they also want more money put toward that process.

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