Election 2018

photo of Rich Cordray
RICHKNOWSOHIO.COM

As the candidates for governor gear up for the final push for votes this fall, the Democrat in the race continues to be criticized by many political pundits for being too dry and nerdy. Now, Rich Cordray himself is launching a social media campaign to capitalize on that image.

Many people know Cordray was a five-time champion of the "Jeopardy" game show back in 1987. And for those who don’t, Cordray’s campaign is putting out ads on social media that pose trivia questions to someone walking down the street then he answers. 

Photo of a kidney dialysis patient
SHUTTERSHOCK

A union that intended to put a measure capping kidney dialysis costs on the Ohio ballot this fall said it isn’t giving up, despite a ruling from the state’s top court that won't allow the measure to come before voters  this November.

photo of Richard Cordray
DAN KONIK / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Democratic gubernatorial hopeful Richard Cordray unveiled a workforce development and job creation plan, saying that workers must come first if the state wants to thrive economically. His proposal also includes focusing on small businesses and investment in training.

Cordray said one of the biggest challenges the state faces is a widening skills gap where there aren’t enough trained workers to fill job vacancies. 

photo of Mike DeWine
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The Republican candidate for governor has rolled out a workforce development and economic investment plan that he described as cutting edge, focusing on public-private partnerships but also shutting down what he said are regulations that hurt businesses.

Mike DeWine said his “prosperity plan” has several components:

photo of Ohio Supreme Court
DAN KONIK / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Ohioans won’t vote this fall on a ballot issue capping how much clinics can charge for kidney dialysis. The Ohio Supreme Court says signatures were gathered for the Kidney Dialysis Patient Protection Amendment without the proper paperwork.

The Ohio Supreme Court ruled a California company working for the issue’s backers didn’t fill out the required disclosure forms before paid workers gathered signatures.  

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