Case Western Reserve University

JEFF ST.CLAIR / WKSU

American manufacturing is at a crossroads:

Not only in terms of changing technology and increased competition, but whether workers are ready for the next industrial revolution.

In this week’s Exploradio, WKSU’s Jeff St. Clair looks at how one Cleveland community is adapting to Industry 4.0.

JEFF ST.CLAIR / WKSU

Cleveland has the highest concentration of small manufacturers in Ohio.

Many of these companies have been making things the same way for generations.

In the first of a two-part Exploradio, we look at the way things have been made, and what companies need to change in order to survive.

We may be on the cusp of another industrial revolution, engineers call it Industry 4.0.

Industry 1.0 was the steam engine.   

Case Western Research Team Aims to Reduce Food Insecurity

Aug 24, 2018
proteins on the noodle bar
ZACHARY DUVALL / WKSU

A research team at Case Western Reserve University is leading a food systems study as part of an effort to tackle food insecurity in Cleveland.

The study will look at community efforts including social marketing for healthy eating, expansion of local supermarkets and emergency assistance programs to figure out what changes can be made to reduce food insecurity and nutrition inequity.

Darcy Freedman, an associate professor in Case Western Reserve University school of medicine, is leading the study.

photo of red light signal
MONTICELLO / SHUTTERSTOCK

A new analysis by Case Western Reserve University finds that red light cameras do little to reduce accidents at the intersections where they are installed.

Researchers examined data from Houston over a 12-year period, during which the city ended its red light camera program.

JEFF ST.CLAIR / WKSU

A researcher at Case Western Reserve University discovered a new treatment for spinal cord injuries that may allow nerves to regrow and perhaps restore lost movement to paralyzed people.

The breakthrough comes after a three-decade search.

It was once thought that damaged nerve cells could never regrow, but Jerry Silver, who is a distinguished professor in neuroscience, never bought into that.

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