Morning Headlines: UA Enrollment Down; Groundbreaking for Akron Main Street Project

Sep 12, 2018

Here are your morning headlines for Wednesday, September 12:

  • University of Akron reports sharp decrease in enrollment; 
  • Groundbreaking for Akron Main Street project;
  • Akron's West Point announces closing date;
  • Ohio to announce winners of global technology challenge;
  • Former OSU workers report odd behavior of deceased wrestling coach;

University of Akron reports sharp decrease in enrollment
Enrollment is down again at the University of Akron — this semester by seven percent.  The Akron Beacon Journal reports enrollment is just over 20,500 — down from a high of 30,000 in the Fall of 2011. The university’s chief financial officer told the paper that the drop is due to the continuing impact of a 20 percent decline in the number of Freshmen two years ago and tightened admission standards. UA officials point out that there is an overall decline in higher ed students around the country. Kent State is expected to announce its enrollment figures at today’s board of trustees meeting.

Groundbreaking for Akron Main Street project
Groundbreaking is scheduled today for a project intended to transform Akron’s Main Street.  The $31 million project includes a dedicated bus lane, new sidewalks, LED lighting and a roundabout at the intersection of Main and Mill Streets.  Money for the project is coming from a federal TIGER grant. Mayor Dan Horrigan, Congressman Tim Ryan and transportation officials are expected to be at this morning’s groundbreaking.

Akron's West Point announces closing date
West Point Market has named its closing date, sort of.  Owner Rick Vernon told Cleveland.com the 80-year-old, family-run market will close on Sept. 15, sooner if they run out of food.  The store sold its previous building in 2015 and relocated a year later to its current location. Vernon said he moved the store from Chapter 11 to Chapter 7 bankruptcy in court proceedings this week to liquidate the store.

Ohio to announce winners of global technology challenge
Ohio is set to announce the winners in the second stage of its global technology challenge aimed at finding solutions to the opioid crisis. Business and innovation experts from around the world were invited to propose technologies for diagnosing, treating or fighting opioid addiction or for protecting medical professionals and first responders from exposure to dangerous opioid residue. In last year’s State of the State address, Gov. John Kasich called for an effort promoting the use of science against the epidemic. That turned into a two-pronged effort including the $8-million Ohio Opioid Technology Challenge and $10 million in research-and-development grants. The goal of the latest phase is to generate technical solutions in areas of unfilled need.

Former OSU workers report odd behavior from deceased wrestling coach
Two men who worked at the off-campus clinic for an Ohio State University doctor said things that seemed odd about it then now appear more suspicious in light of claims that he sexually abused male athletes and other students. They said Richard Strauss conducted exams alone at the sparsely equipped clinic and marketed it in the campus newspaper with ads touting prompt treatment of genital problems, plus a student discount. Allegations of sexual misconduct at the clinic are part of an ongoing investigation.