Scott Horsley

Scott Horsley is a White House correspondent for NPR News. He reports on the policy and politics of the Trump Administration.

Horsley took up the White House beat in 2009 after serving as a San Diego-based business correspondent for NPR where he covered fast food, gasoline prices, and the California electricity crunch of 2000. He reported from the Pentagon during the early phases of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Before joining NPR in 2001, Horsley was a reporter for member station KPBS-FM, where he received numerous honors, including a Public Radio News Directors' award for coverage of the California energy crisis.

Earlier in his career, Horsley worked as a reporter for WUSF-FM in Tampa, Florida, and as a news writer and reporter for commercial radio stations in Boston and Concord, New Hampshire. Horsley began his professional career as a production assistant for NPR's Morning Edition.

Horsley earned a bachelor's degree from Harvard University and an MBA from San Diego State University.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Updated at 6:20 p.m. ET

President Trump declared on Tuesday that his administration will remain a "steadfast partner" of Saudi Arabia, despite the CIA's assessment that Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman personally approved the killing last month of journalist Jamal Khashoggi.

"Maybe he did and maybe he didn't," Trump said of the crown prince's knowledge of the killing.

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Updated at 1:25 p.m. ET

President Trump and televised spectacle go together like peas and carrots. And those just happen to be the names of the unflappable turkeys that Trump pardoned — on camera — Tuesday afternoon.

Updated at 5:38 p.m. ET

President Trump tried to sidestep criticism from a former top military commander by insisting that retired Adm. William McRaven is simply a political player from the camp of his former opponent Hillary Clinton.

That's not so.

Conservative lawyer George Conway says he no longer feels comfortable in the Republican Party. And he is urging fellow conservatives to speak up more loudly, when they see President Trump challenging the rule of law.

Conway's frequent criticism of the president attracts outsize attention because he is married to White House counselor Kellyanne Conway.

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