Sarah Taylor

Broadcast and Digital Editor

Credit CLAIRE TAYLOR

A Northeast Ohio native, Sarah Taylor graduated from Miami University in Oxford, Ohio where she worked at her first NPR station, WMUB. She began her professional career at WCKY-AM in Cincinnati and spent two decades in television news, the bulk of them at WKBN in Youngstown (as Sarah Eisler). For the past three years, Sarah has taught a variety of courses in the School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Kent State, where she is also pursuing a Master’s degree. Sarah and her husband Scott, have two children. They live in Tallmadge.

Ways to Connect

photo of prison bars
WIKIMEDIA

In November, Ohioans will decide whether or not to amend the state constitution with a provision that addresses how the state handles drug offenders. Issue 1, which is titled To Reduce Penalties for Crimes of Obtaining, Possessing, and Using Illegal Drugs, would add a new Section 12 to Article XV of the Constitution of the State of Ohio. The official language of the proposal is here:

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BETSY RADER CAMPAIGN

Dissatisfaction with current elected officials has led a number of newcomers to jump into the political arena this midterm election. One of the biggest challenges they face is raising enough money to run a competitive campaign.

Just ask long-time Democratic political consultant and author Jerry Austin.

In an unusual weekend session, the U.S. Senate advances to a final vote on the nomination of Judge Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court. Watch the proceedings live.

SARAH TAYLOR / WKSU

This week, 20,000 Portage County children are taking home a resource guide aimed at fighting the addiction epidemic that has claimed nearly 200 lives in the county since 2012.

The guide was developed by the Record-Courier newspaper and features information about new efforts to treat addiction through a program developed at University Hospitals Portage Medical Center in Ravenna.

STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Universities throughout Ohio are reporting crime statistics on their campuses as part of the Clery Act – a law that requires colleges that receive federal funding to make known crime statistics for the past three years. But State Auditor Dave Yost says he thinks the process for doing this needs to be improved. 

   

Yost says colleges need to reach out to a lot of different sources to get the data needed to compile the report. He says it’s been a challenge for them so he wants his office to help in that effort.

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