Kabir Bhatia

Reporter

Kabir Bhatia joined WKSU as a Reporter/Producer and weekend host in 2010.  He received his Bachelor's and Master's degrees from Kent State University.  While a Kent student, Bhatia served as a WKSU student assistant, working in the newsroom and for production.

Among his awards, he was named Best of Show – Best Reporter in Ohio for 2013 by the Ohio chapters of the Society of Professional Journalists.

Ways to Connect

photo of Akron Art Museum Dot
KABIR BHATIA / WKSU

The Akron Art Museum has a new employee: she never eats, she never sleeps, and she’s ready to give tours to every single person who walks into the building.

The new digital tour guide, Dot, lives within the Facebook Messenger app. The goal is to provide information on the museum’s collection and also stimulate conversation among visitors.

Virginique Whitmore, an Akron Public Schools high school teacher, was at the launch party for Dot. She says the app has a major advantage when it comes to reaching her students.

photo of Green Local Schools
GREEN LOCAL SCHOOLS

Tomorrow’s special election includes several school levies around the state – including three in Northeast Ohio.

photo of Innerbelt National Forest
KABIR BHATIA / WKSU

The Innerbelt National Forest is now open to the public, bringing new green space to downtown Akron.

Adirondack chairs, potted trees and an amphitheater are now nestled into a spot adjacent to the Innerbelt, a now-closed highway. The forest was funded by more than $214,000 from the Knight Foundation. One of the volunteers who helped plant trees was Patricia Mosley from Fairlawn, who says she hopes the city is receptive to expanding the project.

Gabe Pollack, Ron Busch
KABIR BHATIA / WKSU

Musicians have certain nightclubs and concert halls where they love to play. Sometimes it’s the look, the feel and the history. But what’s even more essential is the sound. WKSU’s Kabir Bhatia finds out more in this week’s “Shuffle.”

photo of Elizabeth Knowles
KABIR BHATIA / WKSU

The University of Akron’s law school put on a training for attorneys Wednesday who may be interested in pro bono work navigating the complex web of deportation hearings.

Organizers of the training said attorneys want to learn more about immigration law given the large-scale raids that have happened in Northeast Ohio this year.

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