Jo Ingles

Statehouse Reporter

Jo Ingles is a professional journalist who covers politics and Ohio government for the Ohio Public Radio and Television for the Ohio Public Radio and Television Statehouse News Bureau. She reports on issues of importance to Ohioans including education, legislation, politics, and life and death issues such as capital punishment. Jo started her career in Louisville, Kentucky in the mid 80’s when she helped produce a televised presidential debate for ABC News, worked for a creative services company and served as a general assignment report for a commercial radio station. In 1989, she returned back to her native Ohio to work at the WOSU Stations in Columbus where she began a long resume in public radio.

After working for more than a decade at WOSU-AM, Jo was hired by the Ohio Public Radio/TV News Bureau in 1999. Her work has been featured on national networks such as National Public Radio, Marketplace, the Great Lakes Radio Consortium and the BBC. She is often a guest on radio talk shows heard on Ohio’s public radio stations. In addition, she’s a regular guest on WOSU-TV’s “Columbus on the Record”, WOSU Radio’s “All Sides with Ann Fisher” and other radio and television shows throughout the state. Jo also writes for respected publications such as Columbus Monthly and the Reuters News Service. She has won many awards for her work across all of those platforms. She is currently the president of the Ohio Radio and TV Correspondent’s Association, a board member for the Ohio Legislative Correspondent’s Association and a board member for the Ohio Associated Press Broadcasters. Jo is also the media adviser for the Ohio Wesleyan University, “Transcript” newspaper. She also teaches radio productions courses there. She lives in southern Delaware County with her husband, Roger, and two children.

Ways to Connect

Photo of marijuana leaves
JO INGLES / OHIO PUBLIC RADIO

None of the 56 medical marijuana dispensaries planned for under the state’s new Medical Marijuana Program are operating yet. But that’s not stopping some doctors from writing recommendations for patients who can ultimately use the drug when it does become available. 

There are nearly 300 doctors who have been certified by the state to recommend medical marijuana for patients with 21 specific conditions. Connor Shore represents a group of eight doctors throughout the state who are already doing that.

photo of stethoscope and money
SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

Ohio Medicaid says it will continue to enforce a new rule requiring background checks of Medicaid providers. Some of them say the new practice will cost some good providers their jobs and will worsen tight staffing situations.

A photo of the flyer.
JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The U.S. Supreme Court recently issued a landmark ruling that overturns 40 years of precedent and ends compelled union dues for public employees. Now, a right leaning think tank is going a step further and mailing literature to make sure public employees in Ohio know they don’t have to pay into the union. 

The Buckeye Institute’s flier promotes a website where workers can find information on how to quit paying union dues. The organization’s president, Robert Alt, says they deserve to know how to do that.

Statehouse News Bureau / Statehouse News Bureau

Schools throughout Ohio are finding out whether they are making the grade on the state’s annual school report cards released Thursday.   State school Superintendent Paolo DeMaria is upbeat about the report cards this year, urging Ohioans to look at the data behind the grades. “We’re seeing improvement and academic achievement happening all across the state in every corner of the state.” Overall school and district grades are new this year, and it would be hard to see that improvement by looking at those.

Statehouse News Bureau / Statehouse News Bureau

The state has put out the latest report card for school districts. Cleveland, Columbus, Dayton, Youngstown and Toledo got failing grades while many wealthier suburban areas of the state got high marks.  

Pages