Jo Ingles

Statehouse Reporter

Jo Ingles is a professional journalist who covers politics and Ohio government for the Ohio Public Radio and Television for the Ohio Public Radio and Television Statehouse News Bureau. She reports on issues of importance to Ohioans including education, legislation, politics, and life and death issues such as capital punishment. Jo started her career in Louisville, Kentucky in the mid 80’s when she helped produce a televised presidential debate for ABC News, worked for a creative services company and served as a general assignment report for a commercial radio station. In 1989, she returned back to her native Ohio to work at the WOSU Stations in Columbus where she began a long resume in public radio.

After working for more than a decade at WOSU-AM, Jo was hired by the Ohio Public Radio/TV News Bureau in 1999. Her work has been featured on national networks such as National Public Radio, Marketplace, the Great Lakes Radio Consortium and the BBC. She is often a guest on radio talk shows heard on Ohio’s public radio stations. In addition, she’s a regular guest on WOSU-TV’s “Columbus on the Record”, WOSU Radio’s “All Sides with Ann Fisher” and other radio and television shows throughout the state. Jo also writes for respected publications such as Columbus Monthly and the Reuters News Service. She has won many awards for her work across all of those platforms. She is currently the president of the Ohio Radio and TV Correspondent’s Association, a board member for the Ohio Legislative Correspondent’s Association and a board member for the Ohio Associated Press Broadcasters. Jo is also the media adviser for the Ohio Wesleyan University, “Transcript” newspaper. She also teaches radio productions courses there. She lives in southern Delaware County with her husband, Roger, and two children.

Ways to Connect

photo of Brenda Ryan
JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Gov. John Kasich has signed a bill into law that increases penalties for drug trafficking.

Cuyahoga Falls resident Brenda Ryan is raising her 7-year-old grandson after his mother, Sheena Moore, died from a drug overdose in 2016. She was only 31 years old. 

Ryan says the man who provided the deadly drugs to her daughter spent only eight years in prison because the penalties were reduced once it was determined the drug wasn’t heroin.

photo of marijuana
United States Fish and Wildlife Service

The state has issued the first license for a large-scale medical marijuana cultivator under Ohio’s medical marijuana program.

Ohio Department of Commerce spokeswoman Stephanie Gostomski said Buckeye Relief has passed its inspection and has been issued a certificate of operation, the first issued to a large-scale cultivator, which is allowed to grow up to 25,000 square feet of medical marijuana. 

photo of Blindsquare
JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

New navigation technology made possible by the state is helping blind students at Columbus State Community College get around the campus easier.

A phone app called Blindsquare is being used at the Columbus campus to help blind students maneuver their way around without assistance.

Kevin Martin, the head of the state agency that helps disabled people live independently, said it provided the $10,000 needed to install the system.

photo of kidney dialysis patient
SHUTTERSTOCK

There are questions about whether Ohio voters will see an issue on the ballot this fall that, if passed, would put restrictions on clinics that provide kidney dialysis. First, the group backing the referendum effort fell short of signatures, and now supporters of the measure are facing a lawsuit.

photo of Greg Moody
DAN KONIK / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

One of Gov. John Kasich’s top department chiefs has resigned.

Greg Moody, the man Kasich tapped to head a new health policy office he created, will be stepping down in a few days.

Moody will leave the governor’s Office of Health Transformation at the end of this month and begin an academic appointment at The Ohio State University Aug. 1. He’ll serve as Executive in Residence at the John Glenn College of Public Affairs.

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