Jo Ingles

Statehouse Reporter

Jo Ingles is a professional journalist who covers politics and Ohio government for the Ohio Public Radio and Television for the Ohio Public Radio and Television Statehouse News Bureau. She reports on issues of importance to Ohioans including education, legislation, politics, and life and death issues such as capital punishment. Jo started her career in Louisville, Kentucky in the mid 80’s when she helped produce a televised presidential debate for ABC News, worked for a creative services company and served as a general assignment report for a commercial radio station. In 1989, she returned back to her native Ohio to work at the WOSU Stations in Columbus where she began a long resume in public radio.

After working for more than a decade at WOSU-AM, Jo was hired by the Ohio Public Radio/TV News Bureau in 1999. Her work has been featured on national networks such as National Public Radio, Marketplace, the Great Lakes Radio Consortium and the BBC. She is often a guest on radio talk shows heard on Ohio’s public radio stations. In addition, she’s a regular guest on WOSU-TV’s “Columbus on the Record”, WOSU Radio’s “All Sides with Ann Fisher” and other radio and television shows throughout the state. Jo also writes for respected publications such as Columbus Monthly and the Reuters News Service. She has won many awards for her work across all of those platforms. She is currently the president of the Ohio Radio and TV Correspondent’s Association, a board member for the Ohio Legislative Correspondent’s Association and a board member for the Ohio Associated Press Broadcasters. Jo is also the media adviser for the Ohio Wesleyan University, “Transcript” newspaper. She also teaches radio productions courses there. She lives in southern Delaware County with her husband, Roger, and two children.

Ways to Connect

photo of Sherrod Brown
JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Fresh off his re-election last week, U.S. Sen. Sherrod Brown is thinking about his next step. He’s considering a run for president.

Brown, who won re-election by six points, said he’s being urged to run for president and he says he’s thinking about it.

House Speaker Ryan Smith (R-Bidwell) talking to reporters following a House Finance Committee meeting on Tuesday.
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Leaders of the Ohio legislature say it’s time to look at changing the methods citizens groups are using to try to amend the state’s constitution. 

House Speaker Ryan Smith says Ohio’s constitution is under attack, as groups have been asking voters to amend it as a way to get around the legislature on certain issues. And the Republican leader says that’s not what the state’s founding fathers envisioned.

“We’re going to work in a bipartisan way to have those discussions and try to make sure that we do our best to protect that document because it is too important.”

JO INGLES / OHIO PUBLIC RADIO

The newly opened National Veterans Memorial and Museum in Columbus is open this weekend to celebrate Veteran’s Day.

Museum project manager Amy Taylor says the new $82 million, 53,000 square foot facility is unique.

“This museum is special because it tells the story of veterans from the dawn of our country, all the way through to the present. And while we certainly have branch of service museums and conflict museums, this is the one place that takes all of those stories from all of those conflicts and from peace time and tells it all in one place.”

Photo of Richard Cordray and Betty Sutton
JO INGLES / OHIO PUBLIC RADIO

The blue wave that had been talked about nationally so much was barely a ripple in Ohio.

While Democratic U.S. Senator Sherrod Brown was reelected, it was a tough loss for gubernatorial candidate Richard Cordray.

“I believe that successful politics is not always defined by the outcome of an election," he said. "The reason we do this is because we want to improve people’s lives. And I believe the work that all of you have done throughout this campaign has changed the conversation in ways that will dramatically improve the lives of people all over Ohio.”

photo of voting stickers
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Voters in southwest Ohio’s Butler County who returned ballots in envelopes that didn’t have the correct information on them will get their votes counted anyway.

Pages