Jeff St. Clair

All Things Considered host, Exploradio

A career in radio was a surprising turn for me seeing that my first love was science. I studied chemistry at the University of Akron and for 13 years lived the quiet life of an analytical chemist in the Akron area,listening to WKSU all the while in the lab.

A few small explosions and chemical spills helped me decide that it was time to look for a new career. In 1998 I landed a part-time position at WKSU and began hosting the Sunday local performance show, In Performance. The magic of radio did its work on me, and in December 2000 I permanently shed the lab-coat to join WKSU full-time and have never looked back.

As the local host of NPR's All Things Considered, I love connecting with listeners as they’re heading home.  It’s a privilege to introduce listeners to the fascinating guests, artists, experts, and news makers that are heard each day on NPR.  It’s a conversation that enriches us all.

I’m also thrilled to share my love of science with listeners through Exploradio, along with reporting on the environment, business, and politics.

Reporting the news is perfect for someone like me because I’m intensely curious ( i.e. nosy)  and have a very short attention span! I'm grateful to have found my niche.

WKSU is one of those rare places where creativity and technology come together to create a product that touches your intellect and your soul—it makes you laugh and carries you through times of reflection.

I sometimes imagine that a young person listening today will be inspired to make the world a better place because of something he or she heard on WKSU. I'm extremely proud to be part of one of the best stations in the public radio system.

I live in Kent with my wife and my three wonderful children.

Ways to Connect

JEFF ST.CLAIR / WKSU

A researcher at Case Western Reserve University discovered a new treatment for spinal cord injuries that may allow nerves to regrow and perhaps restore lost movement to paralyzed people.

The breakthrough comes after a three-decade search.

It was once thought that damaged nerve cells could never regrow, but Jerry Silver, who is a distinguished professor in neuroscience, never bought into that.

CONVELO THERAPEUTICS

A team at Case Western Reserve University has come up with a new approach to treating Multiple Sclerosis. They’ve also launched a business to bring the new therapy to market.

The company is called Convelo Therapeutics.

Cleveland Clinic Akron General
JEFF ST.CLAIR / WKSU

Cleveland Clinic Akron General unveiled its new state-of-the-art emergency department that greatly expands the hospital’s ability to treat people with life-threatening injuries.

The head of the emergency department, Dr. Steven Brooks, led a tour of the gleaming white 67,000- square-foot facility. The new ER is a stand-alone building across the street from the existing ER in downtown Akron.

Brooks pointed to equipment in one of the two acute trauma operating room.

“We can crack a chest in here. We can open the abdomen, if need be by the trauma surgeons,” he said.

NASA

While nuclear power in Ohio is heading into the sunset, NASA Glenn in Cleveland has developed a portable nuclear energy system for outer space.

In this Week’s Exploradio, WKSU’s Jeff St.Clair looks at how the system combines a new nuclear concept with a centuries-old mechanical engine.

At the unveiling of the new Kilopower system, Jim Ryder, NASA’s head of space technology laid out why it’s needed.

photo of Cleveland March For Science
MARCH FOR SCIENCE CLEVELAND

Science enthusiasts are planning a March for Science in Cleveland on Saturday.

Organizers say it’s a celebration of science and a call to support the scientific community. Case Western Reserve University biologist Patricia Princehouse is one of the organizers.

She said recent attempts by the federal government to censor, or misrepresent findings concerning climate change, endangered species, and other issues amount to an attack on science.

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