Jeff St. Clair

All Things Considered host, Exploradio

A career in radio was a surprising turn for me seeing that my first love was science. I studied chemistry at the University of Akron and for 13 years lived the quiet life of an analytical chemist in the Akron area,listening to WKSU all the while in the lab.

A few small explosions and chemical spills helped me decide that it was time to look for a new career. In 1998 I landed a part-time position at WKSU and began hosting the Sunday local performance show, In Performance. The magic of radio did its work on me, and in December 2000 I permanently shed the lab-coat to join WKSU full-time and have never looked back.

As the local host of NPR's All Things Considered, I love connecting with listeners as they’re heading home.  It’s a privilege to introduce listeners to the fascinating guests, artists, experts, and news makers that are heard each day on NPR.  It’s a conversation that enriches us all.

I’m also thrilled to share my love of science with listeners through Exploradio, along with reporting on the environment, business, and politics.

Reporting the news is perfect for someone like me because I’m intensely curious ( i.e. nosy)  and have a very short attention span! I'm grateful to have found my niche.

WKSU is one of those rare places where creativity and technology come together to create a product that touches your intellect and your soul—it makes you laugh and carries you through times of reflection.

I sometimes imagine that a young person listening today will be inspired to make the world a better place because of something he or she heard on WKSU. I'm extremely proud to be part of one of the best stations in the public radio system.

I live in Kent with my wife and my three wonderful children.

Ways to Connect

JEFF ST.CLAIR / WKSU

American manufacturing is at a crossroads:

Not only in terms of changing technology and increased competition, but whether workers are ready for the next industrial revolution.

In this week’s Exploradio, WKSU’s Jeff St. Clair looks at how one Cleveland community is adapting to Industry 4.0.

JEFF ST.CLAIR / WKSU

Cleveland has the highest concentration of small manufacturers in Ohio.

Many of these companies have been making things the same way for generations.

In the first of a two-part Exploradio, we look at the way things have been made, and what companies need to change in order to survive.

We may be on the cusp of another industrial revolution, engineers call it Industry 4.0.

Industry 1.0 was the steam engine.   

JEFF ST.CLAIR / WKSU

A Cleveland manufacturer says the tariffs imposed against imported steel are making it harder to do business in the U.S. It's hoping for a quick resolution of trade disputes with suppliers.

Dan Collins is VP of sales and marketing at Wire Products Company in Cleveland.

His two west-side plants convert coils of steel wire into latches, springs, hooks, and clips for everything from lawn mowers to jet airplanes.

Collins says, after years of steady pricing, the industry is in upheaval.

JEFF ST.CLAIR / WKSU

Fake news is a term that’s come to define our current political landscape, but it’s nothing new.

Propaganda, lies, and fairy tales have always been part of human discourse.

In this week’s Exploradio, we talk with two researchers looking into the psychology behind believable falsehoods and how to guard against them.

We live in an age where facts are called into question, and the truth is slippery. 

JEFF ST.CLAIR / WKSU

There’s a summer program in Northeast Ohio that offers hands-on experience with the cadavers used by medical students.

The Northeast Ohio Medical University in Rootstown is opening up its anatomy labs to community members who want to learn more about the human body.

The pace of the program is blistering.

A human brain, beige and lumpy, sits on a bright blue tray as second-year medical student Trey Moberly dives into its structures.

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