Ann Thompson

With more than 20 years of journalism experience in the Greater Cincinnati market, Ann Thompson brings a wealth of knowledge and expertise to her reporting. She has reported for WKRC, WCKY, WHIO-TV, Metro Networks and CBS/ABC Radio. Her work has been recognized by the Associated Press and the Society of Professional Journalists. In 2011 A-P named her “Best Reporter” for large market radio in Ohio. She has won awards from the Association of Women in Communications and the Alliance for Women in Media. Ann reports regularly on science and technology in Focus on Technology.

She has reported from India, Japan, South Korea, Germany and Belgium as part of fellowships from the East-West Center and RIAS.

Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center scientists, in the process of creating a human gastrointestinal system in a lab, have grown an esophagus.

Updated: 6:25 p.m.  

Cincinnati Police responded to a call of an active shooter at the Fifth Third Bank building on Fountain Square early Thursday morning. The shooter is dead along with three of his victims. Two others were hospitalized. 

Researchers at The Ohio State University College of Medicine and the Wexner Medical Center have discovered high levels of the hormone aldosterone, already associated with high blood pressure, more than double the chances of a person getting type 2 diabetes. For African-Americans, the risk is almost three-fold. Chinese-Americans are 10 times more likely to develop diabetes.

photo of Nepali immigrants
M.L. SCHULTZE / WKSU

Ohio immigrants are struggling in three key areas, according to a new report. 

Immigration attorney Allison Herre contributed to the "Our Pathway to a Brighter Future" report, which recommends greater access to educational opportunities, affordable legal services and better access to healthcare.

U.S. House of Representatives

Cincinnati-area congressman Brad Wenstrup was the first doctor on the scene this Wednesday morning to treat House Majority Whip Steve Scalise.  Scalise and four others were wounded after a gunman opened fire during baseball practice including Republican congressmen and staffers. Wenstrup is a former army surgeon.

After the gunman was shot by Capitol Hill police, Wenstrup ran out to the field to treat Scalise. He says the experience reminded him of his days as a combat surgeon in Iraq.

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