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Education


More Ohio schools are adding STEM + arts to come up with STEAM
Is STEM education, learning centered around science, technology, engineering and math, missing something?  A new program is injecting the arts in the equation with the hope of spurring innovation.
Story by AMY HANSEN


 
Einstein is art at Hartford school in Canton.
Courtesy of AMY HANSEN
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In The Region:
Correction: The E in STEM stands for engineering. Earlier versions of this story gave the incorrect subject.

STEM education -- that's science, technology, engineering, and math -- has gotten lots of buzz over the past few years. But some educators say the arts are what's truly necessary to make students more creative.

StateImpact Ohio's Amy Hansen takes us to Canton to introduce a STEAM school, a relatively new and unproven model that encourages students to innovate, with an artistic touch. StateImpact Ohio's Amy Hansen has more:
LISTEN:What could arts do for science, tech, engineering and math?

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It’s a week before school starts, and the hallways are packed at Hartford Middle School’s annual open house.

Over the buzz of students, parents, and teachers getting acquainted, seventh-grader Molly Blair tells me she tends to get the same question when she tells people she goes to a STEAM school.

“What’s that?”

She’s ready with her standard explanation.

 “I just tell ‘em what we actually do, what the letters all stand for, then they start to understand it.”

The motivation for STEAM
The idea behind STEAM -- science, technology, engineering, arts and math -- is to find ways to integrate the “A” into all class subjects, believing the fusion of arts and science gives students an edge to create and innovate.

Like STEM, it’s more a philosophy than a specific curriculum, emphasizing connections across subject areas and teaching kids to take what they’ve learned in one classroom and apply it in another.

And the arts should share equal status with STEM subjects, says art teacher Kathy Pugh. 

“It has to be presented to the kids that it’s not an extra, that it is as important of a subject as your math. “

At Hartford, some aspect of art is included within the entire curriculum.  For example, students use using proportional ratios to create life-size models of storybook characters or to design a “dream bedroom” complete with 3D floor plans.

Science teacher Jeff Ferarra is a big supporter of the integration of the two disciplines.

“The real art of science is to have that creativity and to have that interest and that ingenuity to say, ‘Man, what happens if I mess with this? What happens if I try this?’ and dive in. So you have to have this piece there, which I think follows with art in taking that chance.”

But really, that viewpoint isn’t that new in education.

The track record
It’s only been over the past few years that there’s been more of a formal push to emphasize STEAM. Among those leading the way is the Rhode Island School of Design.

It’s been an official STEAM supporter since around 2011.

Director of Government Relations Babette Allina says several big-tech industry players -- like Boeing and Intel -- have already voiced their support for STEAM.

“They talked about STEAM education as highly relevant to their industry, that creativity was sort of at the center at what they’re looking for in their employees.”

But, overall, STEAM as a bona fide education model is still unproven.

Open to interpretation
There are no universal requirements, and in Ohio programs don’t have to be certified through the state Department of Education. Also, implementation can vary by school and teacher, which makes actual results hard to measure.

Martin Storksdieck, director at Oregon State’s Center for Research on Lifelong STEM Learning, doesn’t think there will be a mass movement to integrate the arts with STEM. 

“Once you say STEAM should replace STEM, then you say SHREM should replace STEM, and you put history and political science in there.”

But the STEAM concept has begun to catch on with both businesses and government. A STEAM academy in Texas opened with help from a $5 million grant from Texas Instruments. In Florida, a STEAM school fashion design class is working with NASA to create garments that could be used in space. 

STEAM even has supporters on Capitol Hill.  The Congressional STEAM caucus - comprised of about 20 House members from both parties - was formed to last winter to advocate for more integration of the arts with traditional STEM subjects.

Listener Comments:

STEM is Science, Technology, Engineering and Math. Not Education! Your first sentence and intro to this article is incorrect. Please correct this inaccuracy.

Thank you!
Michelle B
Engineering Manager


Posted by: Michelle B (Hinckley) on September 8, 2014 7:09AM
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