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First human cases of West Nile virus reported in Ohio
Other headlines: Ohio River diesel spill flows down stream; Smucker's sales fall 2% in first quarter
by WKSU's JEFF ST. CLAIR


Reporter / Host
Jeff St. Clair
 
  • Smucker's sales fall 2% in first quarter
  • First human cases of West Nile virus reported
  • Texas driller sues Ohio man over anti-waste well billboard
  • Reservoir in Norwalk shows unsafe levels of algal toxin 
  • First human cases of West Nile virus reported
    This year’s first human cases of mosquito-borne West Nile virus in Ohio have been reported.  One of them is a 78-year-old Cleveland woman, and the other is a 24-year-old woman in Muskingum County.  The woman from Cleveland is being treated for encephalitis. The 24-year-old has been released from the hospital. 

    Dr. Richard Gary of the Ohio Department of Health says this West Nile virus season should be milder this season.

    Gary says infection rates in mosquitoes this year are very low compared to the outbreak year of 2012 when they were about ten time higher than now.  He says, "this is looking like a pretty normal West Nile year, not a particularly bad one.”

    Gary attributes the lower numbers to the cooler weather.  But he says people should still take precautions to avoid mosquito bites such as using insect repellent and wearing long-sleeved shirts and long pants in the evening when mosquitoes are most active.  

    Officials say 80 percent of people who are infected with West Nile Virus do not show any symptoms.


    Ohio River diesel spill flows down stream

    Drinking water plants in Ohio and Kentucky have resumed pumping water from the Ohio River after a diesel fuel spill led them to stop intake of river water.

    The districts stopped pumping water from the river after a Monday night spill at a Duke Energy power dumped about 5,000 gallons of fuel oil into the waterway.

    A 15-mile river section, which had closed after the spill, also reopened Tuesday with some restrictions. Vessels traveling through must get Coast Guard clearance and maintain a safe speed.

     
    Smucker's sales fall 2% in first quarter
    J.M Smucker Co.’s quarterly earnings fell slightly short of analysts’ estimates at the start of the fiscal year. 

    The Orrville-based company today reported earnings of $116 million for the quarter.

    Sales fell 2% to $1.32 billion, driven by increased promotional activities in its U.S. retail coffee segment. 

    Smucker shares have declined slightly since the beginning of the year. The stock has decreased 5 percent in the last 12 months.


    Texas driller sues Ohio man over anti-waste well billboard
    An eastern Ohio man who uses a biblical reference and a statement against "poisoned waters" on billboards opposing a deep-injection well is facing a legal threat from the well's Texas operator.

    Texas-based Buckeye Brine alleges that the billboards paid for by Michael Boals of Coshocton contain false and defamatory attacks against its well, which injects contaminated wastewater from oil and gas drilling.

    An environmental legal group argues quoting prophecy from Revelation — on men dying from waters "made bitter" — is Boals' free-speech right.

    The company says its well is safe and legal and the messages are misleading. 

     
    Reservoir in Norwalk shows unsafe levels of algal toxin
    Officials in Norwalk say the city’s drinking water is safe as they battle a harmful algal bloom in a reservoir.

    The Sandusky Register reports that test results released Tuesday showed 22 parts per billion of microcystin toxin, nearly four times the safe limit for for recreational use.

    Norwalk doesn't draw drinking water from the Upper Reservoir, but residents are being warned not to let pets drink from it.

    Snyder says the city's drinking water has no shown any algal toxins.

    Earlier this month, toxins from algae in Lake Erie left about 400,000 people in Toledo without clean tap water for several days.

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