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Kasich speaks out on signing bill to freeze green energy standards
Kasich says it was unrealistic to demand utilities get 25% of their power from alternative energy sources by 2025

Karen Kasler
As often happens with controversial legislation, Gov. John Kasich signed the bill putting a temporary stop to the green energy mandates on Ohio’s electric utilities late on Friday without comment. Now Kasich is speaking out about it/ Statehouse correspondent Karen Kasler reports.
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Gov. John Kasich says he feels the two year stop in the progress of the energy standards – which he calls a “pause” and not a “freeze” – was the right solution to concerns about the utilities’ claims that the alternative energy standards were costing them too much money.

“I think it’s a victory for Ohio’s economy, it’s a victory for those that care about renewables, and frankly I find that most people are unhappy with it – which means I got it in exactly the right place.”

And Kasich said he didn’t think requiring utilities to get 25% of their power from alternative energy sources by 2025 was realistic. Environmental activists, green energy businesses, consumer organizations, manufacturers, and even faith leaders had asked Kasich to veto the bill.  Supporters of it say the two-year pause will allow for a cost-benefit analysis of the green energy standards, but opponents fear it’s the first step toward eliminating them entirely.

Related WKSU Stories

How Ohio's energy standards will change
Friday, May 30, 2014

Ohio Gov. Kasich is expected to sign a bill freezing Ohio's energy standards
Wednesday, May 28, 2014

Are energy-freeze opponents making progress in the Ohio House?
Thursday, May 22, 2014

Listener Comments:

The AEPS has been an economic boon for Ohio manufacturing and clean energy. Thanks in part to these standards, over $1 billion has been invested in the state’s clean energy sector. Freezing the AEPS and establishing crushing setback requirements effectively slams the door on new wind power development in the state.

The wind power supply chain helps provide up to 3,000 manufacturing, construction and support jobs to Ohioans. With public opinion increasingly in favor of expanding the state’s clean energy portfolio, wind power stands to contribute significantly to Ohio’s economy, and in tough times, that’s great news.

Wind power is reliable, immune to fuel price shocks, and helps keep costs low for consumers. The AEPS is a vital catalyst, attracting more private investment and opening the door to efficient, innovative technologies. A study conducted Ohio grid operator PJM found that by obtaining 30 percent of their electricity from wind, they would save $15 billion a year in production costs. Those savings pass on to ratepayers.

At least 15 independent studies conducted by governments, grid operators, and others confirmed that wind energy reduces electricity prices.
One state wind facility with 150 turbines gives $2.7 million a year in payments to local taxing bodies, stimulating growth and revitalizing communities.

Ohio counts among its ranks 62 manufacturing facilities in the wind power supply chain, more than any other state. The Buckeye state plays a critical role in building what has become a homegrown American manufacturing sector. Putting a freeze on the AEPS means a freeze on future investment into the state.

For more information on state and federal energy policies, please visit:
State renewable electricity standards (RES):

Peebles Squire

Posted by: Peebles Squire (Washington, DC) on June 18, 2014 6:06AM
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