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Dimora sues state, private prison for after fall
Other morning headlines: Ohio Libertarians can't put gubernatorial candidate on ballot; Complaint dismissed against anti-sin tax group; New documents show Cleveland kidnapping victims didn't want trial
by WKSU's AMANDA RABINOWITZ


Morning Edition Host
Amanda Rabinowitz
 
Primary voting is underway in Ohio Tuesday until 7:30 p.m.
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  • Dimora sues state, private prison after fall 
  • Voters to choose candidates for November races
  • U.S. Supreme Court dies Libertarian candidate
  • Complaint dismissed against anti-sin tax group
  • New documents show Cleveland kidnapping victims didn't want trial
  • Berry, DeJesus to be honored in D.C. 
  • Mumps case in Ohio Statehouse
  • Measles case suspected in Hudson
  • Cleveland police urged to change sex crime investigation policy
  • Akron to serve as own contractor on first sewer project
  • Shooting at Dayton VA hospital under investigation
  • Dimora sues state, private prison after fall 
    Former Cuyahoga County commissioner Jimmy Dimora wants the state to pay him more than $50,000, after a fall at a private prison where he was incarcerated in 2012. The Columbus Dispatch reports Dimora claims he slipped in a puddle of water caused by a leaking roof at the Northeast Ohio Correctional Center in Youngstown in 2012. Dimora wants the state to pay because he says it contracts with the private prison. The state disagrees. Dimora has also sued the company that owns the facility, Corrections Corp. of America. Dimora is serving a 28-year sentence in California for his conviction on 31 corruption charges. The 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals recently rejected his bid for a new trial.

    Voters to choose candidates for November races

    Polls open at 6:30 this morning for today’s primary election. Candidates include a number of incumbent Republicans facing challengers for a chance to keep their seats this fall in the Ohio Statehouse and U.S. Capitol. In the race for governor, Democratic candidate Ed FitzGerald is already looking past his primary opponent, Lary Ealy of Dayton, to campaign against Republican Gov. John Kasich. Voters also will decide which candidates will run in November races for the U.S. House, in a year in which all 16 incumbents are seeking re-election.

    U.S. Supreme Court denies Libertarian candidate

    The U.S. Supreme Court has denied the Libertarian Party of Ohio its chance to get a gubernatorial candidate on the ballot for today’s primary. Ohio's elections chief disqualified that candidate, Charlie Earl, after his nominating petitions were challenged. Libertarians sued, but lost an appeal last week. The party took that decision to the high court where Justice Elena Kagan rejected their request. The party refiled with Justice Clarence Thomas who referred it to the full court, where it was denied Monday. The party's attorney says he will seek a rehearing in federal appeals court.

    Complaint dismissed against anti-sin tax group
    The Ohio Elections Commission has dismissed a complaint that a group opposed to renewal of the Cuyahoga County sin tax lied in its ads. The complaint was filed by Cleveland City Council President Kevin Kelley against Citizens Against Unfair Taxes. The group had claimed that the six tax will give the owners of Cleveland’s pro football, basketball and baseball teams $260 million. The money goes for upkeep of the city-owned facilities, not directly to the owners. Issue 7 would renew taxes on alcohol and cigarettes for another 20 years. Citizens Against Unfair Taxes has been funded by the alcohol industry.

    New documents show Cleveland kidnapping victims didn't want trial
    Newly released documents show that three women held in a Cleveland house before escaping a year ago today all hoped to avoid a trial for their captor. The documents released by the Cuyahoga County Prosecutor's office Monday say the women understood the need to put suspect Ariel Castro in prison for life. The documents also indicate that the FBI and the Cleveland Police Department did not want Amanda Berry, Gina DeJesus and Michele Knight to be re-traumatized by a trial. Castro pleaded guilty to hundreds of charges last year and committed suicide in prison shortly after beginning a life sentence.

    Berry, DeJesus to be honored in D.C. 
    Amanda Berry and Gina DeJesus will be honored tonight by the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children in Washington. Today marks one year since Berry, Dejesus and Michelle Knight were released from 10 years of captivity in a house on Cleveland’s west side. Neither Berry nor DeJesus are giving interviews. But in a statement issued through the Cleveland Courage Fund, Berry says she decided that the right place to be on the anniversary – quote -- “was with other families who have gone through what our family has gone through.” And DeJesus described the last year as “amazing, full of healing and hope.” The women’s captor, Ariel Castro, hanged himself in prison.

    Mumps case in Ohio Statehouse
    The Central Ohio mumps outbreak is now up to 318 cases, and now has more than half as many cases as there were nationwide last year.  The outbreak has reached the Statehouse. The Columbus Dispatch reports that Chief Administrative Officer, Kim Flasher sent a message to Ohio House lawmakers and staffers Sunday informing them that a House staff member has been diagnosed with the mumps and the contagion period is likely to last through most of this week.

    Measles case suspected in Hudson
    The presence of measles may be expanding in Northeast Ohio. WEWS reports the Summit County Board of Health confirmed that it’s investigating a possible case of the measles at Hudson elementary school, Eveamere. No other details have been released. Thirty confirmed measles cases have been reported in Amish communities in six counties, linked to people traveling to the Philippines. Free vaccinations are being offered in counties including Wayne and Knox.

    Cleveland police urged to change sex crime investigation policy
    A national police research and policy group says Cleveland Police could be missing patterns of serial rapists, because they typically stop investigating sex crimes too soon. The department contracted with the Police Executive Research Forum to review its sexual assault investigations after the bodies of eleven women were found at the home of serial killer Anthony Sowell in 2009. According to the Plain Dealer, the agency recommends that Cleveland change its policy of ending investigations after three failed attempts to locate a victim. But Deputy Chief Ed Tomba tells the newspaper that the protocol of calling the victim, knocking on their door and sending a certified letter is sufficient. The agency also criticized the department for taking too long to forward initial rape reports to detectives. The department says it has made changes to correct that problem.

    Akron to serve as own contractor on first sewer project
    The city of Akron will serve as its own contractor on the first major job of its sewer construction project. The Beacon Journal reports that city council approved legislation for the move Monday. Mayor Don Plusquellic recommended it on Friday. The plan is in response to a federal lawsuit challenging the city’s hiring policy for the Rack 15 project. The policy would have required contractors to hire a percentage of workers from within the city each year, with the percentage increasing from 30 to 50 percent by the projects' end. The Ohio Contractor’s Association sued, saying the plan violated the U.S. and state constitutions. Now, with the city serving as contractor, it will be able to decide who is hired. The nearly $9 million Rack 15 project is required by the EPA as part of a larger $1.4 billion sewer overhaul.

    Shooting at Dayton VA hospital under investigation
    Authorities are trying to determine what led to a shooting at a Dayton Veterans Affairs hospital that ended with a housekeeping employee shot in the ankle and a retired worker in custody. Police say 61-year-old Paul Burnside was shot in the ankle Monday in a struggle over a gun with 59-year-old Neil Moore. Authorities say the revolver went off as the two fought over it in an employee break room. Investigators haven't yet determined a motive.

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