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Environment




Exploradio: Tracking Ohio's champion trees
Big trees across the world are threatened, but the list of giants in Ohio is growing
by WKSU's JEFF ST. CLAIR
This story is part of a special series.


Reporter / Host
Jeff St. Clair
 
This red hickory in Akron is the largest in the nation. It's on the registry of champion trees updated twice a year by American Forests. Ohio will add four newly discovered giants to the list on Arbor Day.
Courtesy of Jeff St.Clair
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In The Region:

Ohio is home to 11 national champion trees. They’re the largest of their species in the country. On Arbor Day this Friday, four more newly discovered Ohio giants will be added to the list. 

On this week’s Exploradio, WKSU’s Jeff St.Clair visits two of Ohio’s grand champion trees and meets the people who care for them.

 

Exploradio: Big trees

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A champion tree grows in Akron
The ground next to Dale and Richard McCandless’ Akron home is thick with marble sized hickory nuts. 

But Dale doesn’t mind, “This is a messy tree, and we’ve got a messy yard.” 

Theirs is the largest red hickory (Carya ovalis) in the country, something Richard hadn’t realized until I showed up to see it.

Dale apparently forgot to mention to her husband that the hickory just a few yards from their house is on the official registry of champion trees. 

Twice a year, the conservation group American Forests updates the list of the largest specimens of each of 750 tree species in the country. The McCandless’ red hickory was added in 2010. 

Dale, at the urging of their daughter, had sent measurements of the tree’s girth, height, and spread to the state’s Forestry Division.

She says she had almost forgotten about it until, nearly a year later, an arborist from the Ohio Department of Natural Resources arrived to inspect it.  She says his immediate reaction was, "'Wow!’ and he got all excited and he started measuring it.” 

The record red hickory measures more than 12 feet in circumference and it’s 93 feet high. Arborists estimate its age as only 80 to 90 years, with plenty of growing life ahead.

The jagged bark makes it hard to hug, but the three of us gingerly wrap our arms around it anyway.

Dale McCandless says autumn is when the tree really shines.  "The leaves on this tree are really like sunshine --brilliant slices of gold up there.”


An ancient tree saved from the saws 
The Washington D.C.-based American Forests has maintained the list of champion trees since 1941. Program coordinator Sheri Shannon says foresters back then recognized that America had lost many of its biggest trees to the ax and to plagues like chestnut blight and Dutch elm disease.  “Trees face a lot of things throughout their lifetimes," Shannon says. "It can be disease and pests, natural disasters, fires, even the negligence of humans.”

A light rain is falling in North Canton as Rod Covey shows me damage to a tree he loves. It's a 400-year-old cucumber magnolia (Magnolia acuminata).

He says a windstorm in September 2000 took down a large branch, "probably 40 inches in diameter.” 

Covey says property damage was minimal -- a squashed shrub, a bent fence. But it was enough to prompt someone, Covey still isn’t sure who, to leave a note at the entrance to the gated condo community, threatening to cut the tree down. 

Covey leapt into action.  At the next condo meeting he brought along a piece of the broken limb to prove the tree was strong and healthy. 

“I was really inspired," says Covey. And to drive home the point, he "hit that piece of wood on the table, and people said, 'No, no, no; let’s keep it.’”


Saving Earth's largest living things
This tree sprouted decades before the Pilgrims landed. Now, at around 440 years-old, it’s 25 feet around, nearly 100 feet tall, and still growing. 

Covey has shown the tree to 1,600 visitors since its near downfall. He believes the giant has an effect on people. "And whether they have an infirmity, or whether there’s something in the past, they’re starting to think. It gets you to thinking.” 

Back in his condo, Covey hopes his story of saving the giant cucumber magnolia inspires other tree huggers to keep a watchful eye on the forests. 

He says he'd like to think the people who come to see the giant tree, "are being strengthened and they maybe go back and fight the battle if something comes up like that.” 

Covey worries that his equally elderly neighbors might not be up to the task of watching over their champion cucumber tree. He claims to be the last man standing in the vicinity of the tree, "So if I get hit by a bus, I don’t know what would happen to it.” 

The largest and oldest living things on earth are dying at an alarming rate. A study in the journal Science shows that big trees across the globe are in rapid decline.  

But American Forests hopes its list of national champion trees helps to bring attention to these giants and inspires people to protect them.

(Click image for larger view.)

Listener Comments:

I thank Mr. Rod Covey and the condo association for their meritorious efforts to save the world's largest cucumber magnolia tree ... located in my beloved hometown of North Canton, Ohio. I further thank WKSU for covering such a vitally important story. We really do need our giant trees for the sake of our beloved planet Earth, and I hope that WKSU will provide us more stories like this. Thank you.


Posted by: Edward (Fairlawn) on April 22, 2014 11:04AM
No one but you can take credit for saving the tree. Try to stay away from buses.


Posted by: Joe niamtu (Auburn knolls) on April 22, 2014 11:04AM
Nice story. Cover more like this one please!


Posted by: Jim (North Canton) on April 22, 2014 6:04AM
Yes, we all love our cucumber magnolia tree within our private condo association, but ALL owners in the association contribute to insuring that the tree is very adequately maintained


Posted by: Ray (North Canton) on April 22, 2014 2:04AM
Absolutely loved this story. We lost 3 of our larger ash trees last year due to EAB. Big, beautiful trees are something to be treasured, and many times they truly are irreplaceable. It's very encouraging to see that these people agree and are doing something about it.


Posted by: Wayne (Ashland) on April 21, 2014 1:04AM
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