News
News Home
Quick Bites
Exploradio
News Archive
News Channel
Special Features
NPR
nowplaying
On AirNewsClassical
Loading...
  
School Closings
WKSU Support
Funding for WKSU is made possible in part through support from the following businesses and organizations.

Lehmans

NOCHE

Meaden & Moore


For more information on how your company or organization can support WKSU, download the WKSU Media Kit.

(WKSU Media Kit PDF icon )


Donate Your Vehicle to WKSU

Programs Schedule Make A Pledge Member BenefitsFAQ/HelpContact Us
Education


E-schoolers make their case to a receptive Ohio Legislature
The on-line schools are growing though there are concerns about performance and transparency
by WKSU's STATEHOUSE BUREAU CHIEF KAREN KASLER


Reporter
Karen Kasler
 
E-school advocates say traditional classrooms are not right for everyone.
Courtesy of Creative commons
Download (WKSU Only)
In The Region:

Nearly 40,000 Ohio children attend more than two-dozen schools that don’t have daily sessions in actual classrooms, or sports teams or mascots, but get millions in state dollars. Statehouse correspondent Karen Kasler reports the families of children attending these schools came to Columbus this week to tell their stories and combat perceptions about online schools.

LISTEN: E-schoolers lobby

Other options:
Windows Media / MP3 Download (3:47)


It was a real-life civics lesson for about a hundred families of Ohio kids who attend electronic schools, or e-schools. They came to the Statehouse to meet with lawmakers who decide on policies related to e-schools, which are public schools and tuition-free but have no scheduled hours, no study halls or lunch periods, and no sports or extracurricular programs.

The e-students stress they’re real schools in the educational sense. Tamara Smathers attends Ohio Virtual Academy from her home in Belmont County. She wanted to find a school that would allow her a schedule flexible enough to allow her time to do theatre. 
“Even though that you don’t have those other people in the room with you, it’s a lot easier because then you don’t have the bullies that are common in public schools.”

More choice
Mindy Brems of Coshocton has two kids in Ohio Connections Academy – a daughter who’s a junior and a son who’s a sophomore. She says she turned to e-schools after investigating other options beyond traditional public school. 
“You hear about poor-performing schools, and you hear about things. I think those are the outliers. I think, across the board, public schools in Ohio are doing a good job. And I think it’s good for students and parents to have a choice. So for me to be able to choose an e-school in a small, rural district is wonderful because we don’t have access to things like kids in Columbus have.”

Poor performance
The state spends $900 million on nearly 400 charter schools; 26 of those are electronic schools. And like other charter or community schools, e-schools have not done well in state rankings. A report three years ago by the liberal think tank Innovation Ohio noted that only 8 percent of students were in e-schools that received what amounted to a B grade or better from the Ohio Department of Education.

But e-school advocates are quick to say that many students end up in these schools because they didn’t do well in traditional public schools, for a variety of reasons. An example is the Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow, or ECOT. Republican Rep. Andy Brenner is from Powell in Delaware County, and he notes ECOT will graduate 2,500 students this year. 
“Well, there’s 2,500 students, of which I believe 85 percent of them are disadvantaged students or are kids who, this is their second chance. That means, of that 2,500 students, a large percentage would have been dropped out and held against the public schools and their rankings would have looked worse had these e-schools not have been there.”

Politics and comparisons
The problem with But e-school critics say more transparency within e-schools – and indeed all charter schools – would allow an apples-to-apples comparison with traditional public schools.

State Sen. Joe Schiavoni is a Democrat of Youngstown, and has sponsored a bill that would require all charters, including e-schools, to be more transparent and undergo an annual audit. 
“People shouldn’t be making money off kids. And that’s the problem. If you look at the founder of ECOT, he’s given $455,000 worth of campaign contributions to legislators since 2009. And if the results don’t match, if the results aren’t promising, if they’re not improving – that’s an issue to me.”

Beyond Schiavoni’s bill – which doesn’t seem likely to move quickly, if at all – there are a few other e-school related bills in the Legislature. One would lift the caps on e-school enrollment, and another would allow homeschooled kids and kids in private and charter schools, as well as those who are in e-schools, to participate in extracurricular activities and sports in the traditional public school system. The moratorium on new e-schools was lifted this year; five were permitted by law, but only three were allowed to open and operate.

Here's more on e-schools from StateImpact Ohio:
http://stateimpact.npr.org/ohio/tag/electronic-classroom-of-tomorrow/ 

Related WKSU Stories

The largest online schools are failing
Thursday, May 12, 2011

The largest online schools are failing
Thursday, May 12, 2011

Add Your Comment
Name:

Location:

E-mail: (not published, only used to contact you about your comment)


Comments:




 
Page Options

Print this page

E-Mail this page / Send mp3

Share on Facebook




Stories with Recent Comments

Ohio lawmakers compromise on teacher evaluation changes
The problem schools have is too much government intervention so what do the Republicans do...add more. As a conservative this liberal style is why I left the p...

What the U.S. Supreme Court ruling means for early voting
r.gov trying to slow down voters to stop the people from voting out the r. govener

Cleveland Orchestra heads home from Europe
So proud to be a lifetime Clevelander! Yes, our Orchestra is the best ambassador a city could hope for! My wife and I happened to hear the European Festival T...

Northeast Ohio undocumented immigrants praying for a miracle
Stop it, just stop it. They are not undocumented but illegal aliens. I live in a 'sanctuary' city and it's not pretty. Dahlberg is a notorious trouble maker in ...

Ohio survey shows low-income people are choosing phones over food
Where is this study published? no sign of it on google scholar. is there a cite

The Akron Sound rocks the porches
fabulous group interview! you covered so much in so little time. wish i could be there for porch rockr.

Head of Ohio Dems says Kasich administration is lying about Suarez contacts
when Kasich's mouth is open , he's lying. Look what he did at Lehmans brothers and then lied about it all during the campaign. If a GOP didn't lie, he or she ...

Canton's Basilica of St. John absorbs news of the pope at morning Mass
Hello Chris,Marina,and Patrice, I just read this article and you all look great. I'm on facebook Jean Dutcher in blue and white stripped blouse. I"M so glad to ...

Exploradio: Avoiding the 'acting-white' trap
Growing-up black and being black should not determine that you will not speak well or will not be a high achiever in your goals in life.But society te nds to la...

Charter-school supporters to rally at Statehouse
I am on the bus now headed to the rally. Horizon is an excellent school. My son is is 7 th grade. The teachers and administrators are top notch and spend so m...

Copyright © 2014 WKSU Public Radio, All Rights Reserved.

 
In Partnership With:

NPR PRI Kent State University

listen in windows media format listen in realplayer format Car Talk Hosts: Tom & Ray Magliozzi Fresh Air Host: Terry Gross A Service of Kent State University 89.7 WKSU | NPR.Classical.Other smart stuff. NPR Senior Correspondent: Noah Adams Living on Earth Host: Steve Curwood 89.7 WKSU | NPR.Classical.Other smart stuff. A Service of Kent State University