News
News Home
Quick Bites
Exploradio
News Archive
News Channel
Special Features
NPR
nowplaying
On AirNewsClassical
Loading...
  
School Closings
WKSU Support
Funding for WKSU is made possible in part through support from the following businesses and organizations.

The Holden Arboretum

Hennes Paynter Communications

Lehmans


For more information on how your company or organization can support WKSU, download the WKSU Media Kit.

(WKSU Media Kit PDF icon )


Donate Your Vehicle to WKSU

Programs Schedule Make A Pledge Member BenefitsFAQ/HelpContact Us


Libertarian challenges his own party's candidate
Ohio headlines: JobsOhio releases 2013 jobs creation report; Kent State considers adding two-year degrees
by WKSU's JEFF ST. CLAIR


Reporter / Host
Jeff St. Clair
 
  • JobsOhio releases 2013 jobs creation report
  • Kent State considers adding two-year degrees
  • More backers calling for Tressel to head YSU
  • Columbus school suspends student for pointing finger
  • Libertarian challenges his party's candidate
    Lawyers sparred Tuesday in Ohio over whether a Libertarian gubernatorial candidate was qualified for the May ballot, a dispute whose outcome could affect Republican Gov. John Kasich's re-election bid.

    Libertarian Charlie Earl has the potential to draw votes from Kasich as the governor faces a likely challenge from Democrat Ed FitzGerald this fall. Kasich has been criticized by tea party activists and other conservatives within the GOP for some of his policy decisions, including backing Medicaid expansion and drilling tax increases.

    Recent polls place Kasich ahead of FitzGerald, the Cuyahoga County executive in Cleveland. But the governor's race in this closely-divided battleground state has a chance of being tight.

    The case seeking to disqualify Earl from the primary ballot was brought on behalf of Tyler King, a Libertarian Ohio voter.

    King's lawyer, Columbus attorney John Zeiger, argued Tuesday before hearing officer Bradley Smith that Earl should be disqualified. He asserted that Democrats circulated Earl's petitions and provided monetary and legal help to the effort.

    Ohio law required petition circulators for Earl to be members of the Libertarian Party, Zeiger argued.

    Capital University law professor Mark Brown, representing Earl, called the challenge an extension of Republican efforts to exclude third parties from Ohio's ballot. He said petition circulators for Earl were legally qualified by Secretary of State Jon Husted, and he accused Zeiger of "bluster and innuendo."

    Brown brought a successful federal legal challenge to the constitutionality of new ballot access rules passed by the Ohio Legislature and signed by Kasich in November.

    Representatives of third parties including the Libertarians, Green Party and others argued in the lawsuit that the law would have effectively eliminated all minor party candidates from May's primary ballots. The law set a vote threshold none had met.

    Smith, also a law professor at Capital, was appointed by Husted, a Republican, to resolve the dispute. A decision must be made by Friday in order to meet Ohio's ballot production deadlines.

     
    JobsOhio releases 2013 jobs creation report
    Governor John Kasich’s private jobs creation agency released its annual report card this week.

    JobOhio reports that it brought nearly 18,000 new jobs to the state from projects involving 264 companies.

    The privatized development agency is funded by the state’s wholesale liquor revenue.


    Kent State considers adding two-year degrees
    Kent State University is considering offering two-year associates degrees to students mid-way through four-year degrees. 

    The Columbus Dispatch reports that the plan announced last week is drawing criticism from some of Ohio’s community colleges who say the change would mean more state money going to Kent State and less money for traditional two-year colleges.

    Kent’s plan would boost the number of degrees awarded which is a key part of a new state funding formula announced last week by governor John Kasich in his state of the state speech.

    Kent State is the only the state’s 13 public four-year universities proposing the change.

     
    More backers calling for Tressel to head YSU
    Support is growing to make former Ohio State University football coach Jim Tressel the next president of Youngstown State University.

    Leaders of an independent fundraising and scholarships group signed a letter endorsing Tressel.

    The Vindicator newspaper reports that 20 members of the Youngstown State University Foundation's board of trustees said that Tressel would help bring more students and money to the university.

    Tressel, who resigned from OSU in 2011 amid a scandal involving players, spent 14 years at Youngstown State before taking over the Buckeyes.

    Tressel has not indicated whether he's interested in the position at Youngstown State. He is now an executive vice president at the University of Akron.


    Columbus school suspends student for pointing finger
    A central Ohio principal says she suspended a 10-year-old boy from school for three days for pretending his finger was a gun and pointing it at another student's head.

    The boy's father says he thinks it's the adults who are acting childish after the boy was suspended from Devonshire Alternative Elementary School in Columbus last week.

    The fifth-grader said he was "just playing around." But district spokesman Jeff Warner tells The Columbus Dispatch that Devonshire principal Patricia Price has warned students about pretend gun play numerous times this year, and everyone should know the rules by now.

    The boy's father said the suspension is overboard.

    Add Your Comment
    Name:

    Location:

    E-mail: (not published, only used to contact you about your comment)


    Comments:




     
    Page Options

    Print this page

    E-Mail this page / Send mp3

    Share on Facebook





    Stories with Recent Comments

    Ohio lawmakers propose grants for home construction for disabled people
    We have been trying to have a "Visitability Bill" passed for years. Thanks, Greg

    Lake County crimes may give Trump immigration fodder
    Shoddy reporting at best. "Mixed views" The question that came to my mind was, "How many people did he have to interview to get "mixed views". Do the two peo...

    Ohio's U.S. Sen. Sherrod Brown announces plans to improve Medicare by lowering prescription costs for seniors
    Sounds good. I'm living in Florida to escape the snow. So far it's working. I retired from GM in 2000. Keep pushing for all the working people. In the long run ...

    The tiny town that time, and elections, forgot may go out of existence
    Thank you for this story. I grew up in Limaville, my parents home is there still...unsellable due to the septic/sewer problem. Sometimes I am sorry I left...wis...

    Where Ohio'sJohn Kasich stands in the presidential polls
    We are fans of Gov. Kasich since he served in the House of Representatives. It pleases us to finally see him as the potential President of the United States. We...

    Cleveland hosts the first national Movement for Black Lives conference
    What a wonderful experience this was, So much love and understanding, without all of the other distractions that tend to come with organizing for change, this e...

    Air Force unit gets training and Youngstown gets rid of some eyesores
    Do they have to totally destroy all the beautiful oak and leaded windows, which I am thinking are probably there? Do they just have to destroy them like that? C...

    Jewish challah and Native American fry bread at an Akron cultural exchange
    Each time I saw the young students relate to each other, I got goose bumps. These young students can and hopefully will teach all of us to live and respect eac...

    One of the Cleveland Orchestra's most celebrated musicians bids farewell
    I had the honor of studying with Franklin Cohen in the late 80s and early 90s. He is unparalleled both as a clarinetist and as a musician. His deep personal war...

    Summa's dress code is not 'etched in stone'
    SOME OF THESE POLICIES ARE A COMPLETE JOKE. UNLESS YOU ARE DOING THESE TYPE OF JOBS EVERY DAY, YOU DON'T KNOW WHAT IS COMFORTABLE AND REASONABLE OR NOT. UNLESS ...

    Copyright © 2015 WKSU Public Radio, All Rights Reserved.

     
    In Partnership With:

    NPR PRI Kent State University

    listen in windows media format listen in realplayer format Car Talk Hosts: Tom & Ray Magliozzi Fresh Air Host: Terry Gross A Service of Kent State University 89.7 WKSU | NPR.Classical.Other smart stuff. NPR Senior Correspondent: Noah Adams Living on Earth Host: Steve Curwood 89.7 WKSU | NPR.Classical.Other smart stuff. A Service of Kent State University