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Lawmakers question Ohio's private police forces
Other headlines: Court says double tasering of inmate justified; Team NEO attracts 16 companies to region in 2013
by WKSU's JEFF ST. CLAIR


Reporter / Host
Jeff St. Clair
 
  • Court says double tasering of inmate justified
  • Bipartisan group urges US Army Corps action against Asian carp
  • Team NEO attracts 16 companies to region in 2013
  • Court says double tasering of inmate justified
    An appeals court has rejected an Ohio inmate's claims that deputies used excessive force when shocking him with a stun gun twice in one day.

    The allegations by Michael Reed were among several claims of unconstitutional use of stun guns brought by inmates at the Franklin County jail in past years.

    Reed said deputies improperly used a stun gun when trying to remove him from his cell for a medical appointment in 2009, and again later in the day at the hospital.

    A three-judge panel of the 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled Thursday that deputies responded appropriately to control Reed and his claims aren't backed up by video evidence.


    Lawmakers question Ohio's private police forces
    Two Ohio lawmakers think arrest and crime reports by police at private universities and hospitals should be made public.

    A House bill proposed Wednesday would make private police forces — including at 17 nonprofit hospitals and 16 private universities in the state — subject to Ohio's public-records laws.

    The Columbus Dispatch reports that more than 800 privately employed police officers in Ohio are authorized by the state to carry handguns and make arrests, but they're not required to provide records to the public.

    Critics say they should have the same transparency and accountability demanded of government police departments.


    Bipartisan group urges US Army Corps to take action against Asian carp
    A group of Ohio Lawmakers with often widely different political perspectives are coming together on one issue of importance to the state.

    Members of congress from both sides of the aisle sent a letter recently to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers urging immediate action to stem the threat of Asian carp to the Great Lakes.

    GOP Representatives Dave Joyce of Bainbridge and Jim Renacci of Wadsworth, together with Democrats Marcia Fudge of Warrensville Heights and Tim Ryan of Niles are urging the Corps to take “quick and decisive action” to prevent the invasive fish from entering the Great Lakes.

    The Army Corps last month issued a long-awaited study detailing several options to keep the fish out, but did not recommend any of them. 

    That decision, they say, belongs with elected officials.

     
    Team NEO attracts 16 companies to region in 2013
    The group that markets Northeast Ohio to the rest of the country is claiming success for its efforts last year.

    Team NEO says it helped bring a record 16 new businesses to the region in 2013.

    Tom Waltermire, CEO of Team NEO says the new companies bring a total of 1,400 new jobs and $85 million dollars in new payroll to the region.  The majority of the companies are in manufacturing, healthcare and biomedical. 

    Team NEO says it has brought 83 companies to the region since it formed in 2007.

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