News
News Home
Quick Bites
Exploradio
News Archive
News Channel
Special Features
NPR
nowplaying
On AirNewsClassical
Loading...
  
School Closings
WKSU Support
Funding for WKSU is made possible in part through support from the following businesses and organizations.

Akron Children's Hospital

Area Agency on Aging 10B, Inc.

Akron General


For more information on how your company or organization can support WKSU, download the WKSU Media Kit.

(WKSU Media Kit PDF icon )


Donate Your Vehicle to WKSU

Programs Schedule Make A Pledge Member BenefitsFAQ/HelpContact Us
Government and Politics


Farm Bill compromise may steer payments for small dairy farms to megafarms
Congressional compromise is expected this week
Story by LEWIS WALLACE


 
Dairy farming has moved largely beyond the small family farms captured in this USDA photo.
Download (WKSU Only)
In The Region:

This week, a congressional committee is expected to come out with a compromise on the Farm Bill after months of debate. For Ohio Public Radio, WYSO’s Lewis Wallace reports that lawmakers agree the bill should provide some kind of safety net for dairy farmers — but they’re hung up on just what that should be.

LISTEN: The farm bill and dairy protections

Other options:
Windows Media / MP3 Download (1:22)


When milk prices drop below a certain point, smaller farmers have been able to get help from the government—it’s been that way since 2002.

That program is called the Milk Income Loss Contract, or MILC for short.

But MILC’s days are numbered.

Cameron Thraen is a professor of economics at Ohio State University. He says the outcome of the current debate will probably be a new program that acts almost as insurance, but would be available to farms of all sizes -- even the mega-farms.

"By doing that there would be a fairly significant shift in the distribution of these benefits away from the small-scale producers towards the larger-scale producers.

He believes there’s another way to cover everyone: Llet your pint-sized farmers have the Milk Income Loss Contract and let farms with more than 200 cows purchase insurance.

"One size fits all is really hard."

Meanwhile, Ohio farmers are anxiously awaiting a resolution.

Mel Borton is a volunteer with the Ohio Farmers Union. He says without government involvement in the dairy industry, small farms would have little chance of surviving.

"We didn’t think we would ever have megafarms, but megafarms have arrived."

And if the Farm Bill must be a bill for all sizes, he’ll take that — over nothing.

Add Your Comment
Name:

Location:

E-mail: (not published, only used to contact you about your comment)


Comments:




 
Page Options

Print this page

E-Mail this page / Send mp3

Share on Facebook



Stories with Recent Comments

Study shows raising the cigarette tax a dollar could raise $342 million
So, it takes an expert to tell us raising the tobacco tax raises the revenue for the state? Doh. By the way, any one who was going to quit smoking probably alre...

Akron's Highland Square celebrates community spirit and public art
Both Donna and her husband, Joseph are both such amazing art talents! The photos look stunning! I must get down to Angel Falls for an in-person look. I just l...

Pluto: Another off-season, another Browns quarterback conundrum
The Browns do need a draftable QB for the future. Johnny Manziel needs to go and that leaves Brian Hoyer and Connor Shaw. Free agency doesn't really have any so...

Exploradio: Improving the lives of paralyzed people
God bless you doctor. I hope to be alive the day that humans, like me, can use the results of your search...

Nature and nourishment down by the river at the Metroparks' Merwin's Wharf
I love QUICKBITES! I look forward to it every week. One question: is it possible to include a link to the restaurant or store that you profile? Thanks!

Canton's proposed Timken-McKinley school merger is drawing spirited debate
From a sports opinion Varsity would have a lot more talent to choose from So Im sure varsity sports would improve.Also Timkens name would be much more published...

Canton school board will decide whether to merge high schools
I really hope we can save those jobs, usually we try to cut budgets but the demand is still the same. Then we look bad a year or two after the descion is made. ...

FirstEnergy wants PUCO guarantees on nuclear and coal prices
Would just comment that the plant has admitted the following (as reporting in the Akron Beacon Journal): "The utility has said it may have difficulty keeping t...

Mozzarella's easy when you have a way with curd
Hello, Where can I get such a heater that you have? Does it hold temperature that you set? What brand and model is it? Thank you in advance!! :)

Pluto: A healthy LeBron James is the key for the rocky Cavs
It's time to back our Cleveland professional teams through thick and thin. I've seen management, players and coaches come and go and it hasn't changed a thing. ...

Copyright © 2015 WKSU Public Radio, All Rights Reserved.

 
In Partnership With:

NPR PRI Kent State University

listen in windows media format listen in realplayer format Car Talk Hosts: Tom & Ray Magliozzi Fresh Air Host: Terry Gross A Service of Kent State University 89.7 WKSU | NPR.Classical.Other smart stuff. NPR Senior Correspondent: Noah Adams Living on Earth Host: Steve Curwood 89.7 WKSU | NPR.Classical.Other smart stuff. A Service of Kent State University