News
News Home
Quick Bites
Exploradio
News Archive
News Channel
Special Features
NPR
nowplaying
On AirNewsClassical
Loading...
  
School Closings
WKSU Support
Funding for WKSU is made possible in part through support from the following businesses and organizations.

Hospice of the Western Reserve

Akron Children's Hospital


For more information on how your company or organization can support WKSU, download the WKSU Media Kit.

(WKSU Media Kit PDF icon )


Donate Your Vehicle to WKSU

Programs Schedule Make A Pledge Member BenefitsFAQ/HelpContact Us
Environment


Air quality study to assess effects of fracking in Carroll County
University of Cincinnati, Oregon State University team up to research possible health risks stemming from chemical air pollutants associated with shale gas drilling
Story by GRACE MURRAY


 
In The Region:

A new air quality study focusing on the effects of shale gas drilling operations is getting underway in the No. 1 Ohio county for fracking – Carroll County.

The University of Cincinnati and Oregon State University study will record samples from the nearly 100 producing wells in Carroll County, as of October. It is set to last a year, and is funded by a National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences grant.

Carroll Concerned Citizens chair Paul Feezel says there’s been a lot of talk regarding potential water contamination associated with fracking, but researchers are now turning their attention to another possible risk – hazardous air quality.

LISTEN TO: FEEZEL ON AIR QUALITY STUDY

Other options:
Windows Media / MP3 Download (0:25)


LISTEN TO: FEEZEL ON AIR SAMPLING DEVICES

Other options:
Windows Media / MP3 Download (0:27)


"Researchers are starting to recognize that some of the long-term exposure to the air can also be a concern for human health risk, so this particular study is starting to look at that," Feezel says. "Because the boom is so early here in Ohio, researchers thought this was a great place to come, and they specifically targeted Carroll County because there are so many wells in such a small geographic area."

The University of Cincinnati completed a similar study on the drinking water wells in Carroll County and found no contamination due to fracking.

Feezel says researchers are looking for willing landowners in the area to place passive air sampling devices on their property. The devices are designed to collect chemical readings for air pollutants often associated with drilling.

"[Researchers] are going to seek a small number of locations where they're going to put passive samplers that are small devices that sit on fence posts or t-posts." he says. "They're targeting within a couple hundred yards of a shale gas pad, and they're specifically looking for those locations that are early in the drilling cycle so they can capture any variations that occur between the drilling, hydraulic fracturing, conversion of production or wells that are actually in production."

Citizens interested in participating or looking for more information on the new study, he says, can come to Carroll Concerned Citizens’ next meeting on January 7th at 9 p.m. in the Carrollton Church of Christ on Moody Avenue.

Listener Comments:

Any business from a bakery to a company that produces windmill turbines that employs hundreds of workers coming and going in numerous cars and trucks with have changes on the environment.This isn't rocket surgery. The alternative is to stay home and be unemployed.


Posted by: david trimble (ohio) on February 20, 2014 9:02AM
Add Your Comment
Name:

Location:

E-mail: (not published, only used to contact you about your comment)


Comments:




 
Page Options

Print this page

E-Mail this page / Send mp3

Share on Facebook



Stories with Recent Comments

Crisis looms in filling aviation industry jobs in Ohio and the nation
I listened to this story yesterday morning on the radio and just want to add this comment. My son went to school to train as an air traffic controller, and gra...

Cuyahoga Valley National Park considers fire to fight invasives
I'm for the controlled burn. There are not enough people (myself included) who volunteer for the removal of invasive plant species. Therefore, another solution ...

Remembering Cleveland music impresario Hank LoConti
The picture here is not the original Agora. It is the old WHK studios where the Agora moved into.

Haslam tells Manziel to prepare to be a Browns backup
I have been a cleveland browns fan since theywere formed in 1945 i bleed cleve browns every sunday i started with marion motley and otto graham i awill be 90 ye...

Sr. Corita Kent's work goes from a forgotten shelf to an entire wall
I am so glad that Sister Corita's work has been found and restored and is on display. I remember seeing it at the 1964 World's Fair in New York and I remember ...

DeWine celebrates Hobby Lobby win; Pepper says it's culture wars
For the sake of our country, our state, and the wellbeing of humanity- people like DeWine and Kasich got to go Ohio!

Cleveland woman honored for work finding work for people with records
This agency is so fundamental in the approach it has taken with changing lives. The pride and hope that is witnessed on the faces of the graduates of the progr...

Kasich says Ohio's Medicaid expansion is paying off for drug treatment
I hope some of that Kasich pragmatism rubs off on SC's Republicans!

Ohio Supreme Court considers whether talk was a threat or speculation
David laber is my father, and yes he gets angy and talks about different things, but who doesnt? Everyone should have that choice and descisoin to their own rig...

New head of the Ohio Education Association says Common Core needs time
OEA should be lobbying against the PARCC assessment, which is placing unrealistic demands on financially strapped school districts to provide hardware and train...

Copyright © 2014 WKSU Public Radio, All Rights Reserved.

 
In Partnership With:

NPR PRI Kent State University

listen in windows media format listen in realplayer format Car Talk Hosts: Tom & Ray Magliozzi Fresh Air Host: Terry Gross A Service of Kent State University 89.7 WKSU | NPR.Classical.Other smart stuff. NPR Senior Correspondent: Noah Adams Living on Earth Host: Steve Curwood 89.7 WKSU | NPR.Classical.Other smart stuff. A Service of Kent State University