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Ohio AG: Lottery's gambling machine plan not legal
Other morning headlines: Longtime Cleveland Indians broadcaster dies; Enforcement of Ohio's exotic animal law begins Jan. 1.
by WKSU's AMANDA RABINOWITZ


Morning Edition Host
Amanda Rabinowitz
 
  • Ohio AG: Lottery's gambling machine plan not legal
  • Longtime Cleveland Indians broadcaster dies
  • Enforcement of Ohio's exotic animal law begins Jan. 1
  • Cleveland man out on parole in murder gets new trial
  • Ohio vets have only days left to apply for bonuses
  • Ohio AG: Lottery's gambling machine plan not legal
    The state attorney general says the Ohio Lottery's plan to replace illegal video raffle machines with new gambling devices at veterans posts and fraternal lodges is unconstitutional because the amount of net proceeds it would yield for education would be too small. Lottery proceeds must go to education under state law, though it doesn't specify an amount. Attorney General Mike DeWine tells The Columbus Dispatch that the proceeds going to schools under the proposal would be much smaller than the percentage provided by existing lottery games. Members of the Ohio Veterans and Fraternal Charitable Coalition have said they don't want the next-generation electronic games because the arrangement wouldn't let posts generate enough for charity.

    Longtime Cleveland Indians broadcaster dies
    Mike Hegan, a former major league player who was a longtime broadcaster with the Cleveland Indians, has died. He was 71. The Indians say Hegan had his family by his side when he died Wednesday morning in Hilton Head, S.C. No other details were provided by the team. Hegan was a radio and TV broadcaster for the Indians for 23 years. He retired after the 2011 season. He also spent 12 seasons as a broadcaster with the Milwaukee Brewers. Hegan made the AL All-Star team with the Seattle Pilots in 1969 and helped the Oakland Athletics win the 1972 World Series. He also played in the 1964 World Series with the New York Yankees.

    Enforcement of Ohio's exotic animal law begins Jan. 1
    The Ohio law banning the sale, ownership and breeding of exotic animals will take full effect on Jan. 1. The exotic-animals law enacted last year bans private owners from acquiring, selling and breeding restricted species in Ohio, like lions and pythons longer than 12 feet. There have been 150 owners, including zoos, who have registered nearly 900 animals. Those people who have met caging and care standards set out in the law can keep their animals. They also have to pay for insurance and a wildlife shelter. But they can’t buy new animals or breed those they have. The state says it will seize any unregistered animals starting Jan. 1. 

    Cleveland man out on parole in murder gets new trial
    A Cleveland man who was convicted of murder and released from prison on parole has won a request for a new trial. A Cuyahoga County judge this week said 39-year-old Anthony Lemons deserves a new trial because prosecutors withheld evidence from defense during the original 1995 trial. Lemons was convicted in the 1994 shooting death of a Cleveland man over what prosecutors said was a dispute over drug money. The Plain Dealer reports that the judge's decision allowing the new trial said police reports not released to the defense included information that throws into doubt the credibility of the key eyewitness. The county prosecutor says his office is reviewing the case.

    Ohio vets have only days left to apply for bonuses

    Some Ohio military veterans eligible for state-funded bonuses of up to $1,500 only have days left to apply. 

    Ohio veterans who served during the Persian Gulf war era must have their applications in no later than Tuesday to receive the bonuses funded by a $200 million bond issue approved by Ohio voters in 2009. 

    The bonuses are open to veterans who served anywhere in the world during the Persian Gulf war era as well as the eras of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. But application times for the lraq and Afghanistan periods continue past Tuesday. 

    The Ohio Department of Veterans Services director urges veterans to check if they think they may be eligible. Director Tim Gorrell says veterans owe it to themselves and their families to find out if they qualify.

     

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