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Cleveland priest arrested after alleged sex solicitation
Other morning headlines: Teen gun violence a problem in Ohio's capital city; Flight from Cleveland makes emergency landing; Lake Erie water growing more expensive to drink
Story by LAUREN SCHMOLL


 
  • Cleveland priest arrested after alleged sex solicitation
  • Teen gun violence a problem in Ohio's capital city
  • Flight from Cleveland makes emergency landing
  • Inmate violence continuing to rise at Toledo Correctional Institution 
  • Lake Erie water growing more expensive to drink
  • Ohio considering limits on farm, sewage-treatment runoffs
  • Ohio to release ring-necked pheasants
  • Law school enrollment down in Ohio
  •  

    Cleveland priest arrested after alleged sex solicitation
    A priest in residence has filled in for a Catholic church pastor who was arrested in Cleveland for allegedly soliciting sex in a park.

    The Plain Dealer reports that there were no direct references to the arrest of the Rev. James McGonegal in Sunday morning Mass at the St. Ignatius of Antioch Church. Parish members declined to comment.

    He was arrested Friday after allegedly soliciting a park ranger who was in plainsclothes at Edgewater Park. Police reports say McGonegal told authorities he has tested positive for HIV.

    Cleveland Catholic Diocese records show the 68-year-old McGonegal has been a priest since 1971. A phone message was left for him.

    The Diocese said in a statement it has a policy of cooperating with civil authorities in such matters.


    Teen gun violence a problem in Ohio's capital city
    On average, a teen in Ohio's capital city is a victim of gun violence every day.

    According to the Columbus Dispatch, for last year, state records show more than 400 cases of Columbus residents under age 20 being shot, robbed, or threatened with a gun. Columbus police statistics show that half of the offenses were committed by other teens.

    Interviews with youths found that guns are part of the fabric of some neighborhoods. In some, nearly everyone knows someone who has been killed by a gun.

    Young people across the state are at risk of gun crime, but it's particularly a problem in its biggest cities.

    The Dispatch reports that Cleveland has the highest rate at 97 gun incidents for every 10,000 youths.


    Flight from Cleveland makes emergency landing
    Officials say a flight carrying 34 passengers from Cleveland to Boston had to make an emergency landing in Buffalo after the crew reported smoke in the cockpit.

    WIVB-TV in Buffalo reports the Chautauqua Airlines flight operating as United Express landed safely yesterday.

    No one was injured.


    Inmate violence continuing to rise at Toledo Correctional Institution 
    Authorities at the Toledo Correctional Institution have seen inmate violence continue to rise despite a series of changes, with four slayings in 13 months.

    The Toledo Blade reports after the state prison's first homicide, staffing was increased and a second investigator added. Then another inmate was killed and authorities added nine officers.

    There have been two more deadly assaults this year.


    Lake Erie water growing more expensive to drink
    Some Ohio cities that draw their drinking water from Lake Erie are spending more money to treat the water because of toxins produced by algae blooms in the lake.

    Toledo will spend an extra $1 million this year to combat the toxins that can kill animals and sicken people.

    Officials in neighboring Ottawa County are considering a fee increase next year to cover the added expenses of testing and treating the water.


    Ohio considering limits on farm, sewage-treatment runoffs
    Ohio could become one of three states to establish limits for farm and sewage-treatment-plant pollution that feeds toxic algae in lakes.

    An Ohio Environmental Protection Agency proposal under review by federal officials would establish limits for phosphorus and nitrogen in streams. Both are found in fertilizers, manure and sewage. They’re called nutrients because they help plants, including algae, grow.

    Phosphorus in fertilizers that rain washes off farm fields feeds blooms of blue-green algae in western Lake Erie and inland lakes across Ohio each summer. The algae produce liver and nerve toxins that can sicken people and animals.

    Ohio EPA Director Scott Nally said he is optimistic that U.S. EPA officials will approve the proposal, which would be used to set specific limits for each Ohio stream.

    Because of the partial government shutdown, federal officials were unavailable to comment. Approval would put Ohio on a path to join Florida and Wisconsin as the only other states setting limits for phosphorus and nitrogen in waterways.


    Ohio to release ring-necked pheasants
    Ohio will release more than 15,000 ring-necked pheasants at 27 Ohio public hunting areas this fall to provide additional hunting opportunities

    The Ohio Department of Natural Resources says pheasants will be released Oct. 18 and Oct. 25, prior to the small-game weekends for youth hunters.

    Ohio's small game hunting season begins Friday, Nov. 1, with pheasant releases scheduled for Oct. 31 and the evening of Nov. 8. The final release of the year is set for the evening of Nov. 27.

    Pheasant hunting season runs from Nov. 1 through Jan. 5.

    State officials say the daily bag limit is two male birds. No females can be killed.

    Statewide pheasant hunting hours are sunrise to sunset.

    Ohio law school enrollment down
    Enrollment is down at Ohio's five public law schools and the number of applications has declined even more amid a glut of lawyers nationwide.

    The Columbus Dispatch reports decreased enrollment has led to some of the smallest classes in the past decade as students consider their chances of getting hired and debate whether the cost of law school is worth it.

    Combined enrollment at Ohio's five public law schools was 674 this year, down from 950 in 2009-2010. The number of applications dropped nearly 40 percent in that span, from about 8,500 to just under 5,200 this fall.

    Nationwide, applications dropped to the lowest level in three decades.

    There are about 45,000 U.S. law school graduates annually, but experts say there are only about half that many positions available.

     

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