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Job growth lags in shale drilling boom
Other headlines: Lawmakers push for repeal of immigrant tuition reform; Haslam could face questions under oath
by WKSU's JEFF ST. CLAIR


Reporter / Host
Jeff St. Clair
 
  • Lawmakers push for repeal of immigrant tuition reform
  • Haslam could face questions under oath
  • Judge rules breathalyzers unreliable
  • Rep. Renacci among top ten richest lawmakers 
  • Woman says gun safety teacher shot her too
  • Afghan massacre defendant had idyllic Ohio childhood
  • Body on Ohio Interstate hit several times 
  • Doctors ponder cause of Mingo's bruised lung
  • Indians sweep Angles in Anaheim   
  • Job growth lags in shale drilling boom
    An updated report shows that the Utica shale boom in Ohio has yet to create many new jobs. 

    The Cleveland State University study looks at job growth in 2012 in the 15 eastern Ohio counties at the center of oil and gas industry.

    Employment in the region went up just .6 percent last year, meanwhile sales-tax receipts rose 20 percent. 

    The Columbus Dispatch reports some of the increased spending likely came from property owners who received signing bonuses for leasing mineral rights.

    But increased hiring of Ohioans has not followed the shale drilling boom.  Study authors say that should change as more wells begin producing.

    Real job growth, they say, will only come if Ohio attracts petroleum processing facilities.


    Lawmakers push for repeal of immigrant tuition reform
    Two Ohio lawmakers are proposing a measure that would overturn a recent decision by the state's higher education chief that allows young immigrants with temporary legal status to pay in-state tuition rates at Ohio's public colleges.

    The bill's proponents are Republican Reps. Matt Lynch, of Bainbridge, and Wes Retherford, of Hamilton. On Wednesday, they said the decision is egregious and will cost Ohio taxpayers millions of dollars.

    Lynch says the immigrants don't fit Ohio's law definition of resident.

    Most of the state's two- and four-year public colleges have previously charged students who do not have permanent legal status tuition rates much higher than what other Ohio students pay.

    The chancellor of the Ohio Board of Regents, John Carey, announced the changes last month.


    Haslam could face questions under oath
    Browns owner Jimmy Haslam may be forced to explain under oath whether he knew about the alleged fuel-price scam at his family’s Pilot Flying J truck-stop firm.

    A judge is expected to decide today whether to grant a request from trucking company lawyers to obtain a sworn deposition from Haslam.

    Haslams attorneys have filed motions to prevent the questioning.

    FBI agents raided Pilot Flying J’s Tenn headquarters in April, following a two-year investigation of claims that Pilot was cheating trucking customers out of diesel fuel rebates.


    Judge rules breathalyzers unreliable
    The controversial machines police use to detect alcohol in drivers could be discontinued.  A judge has ruled that the Intoxilyzer 8000 is not reliable and cannot be used as evidence.

    The ruling last week contradicts the Ohio department of health’s certification of the breathalyzer units.  

    The Columbus Dispatch reports the Health Department bought 700 of the portable testers using a $5 million federal grant. About 400 are in use around Ohio now.

    Defense attorneys challenging breathalyzer evidence argue that heat, humidity and other factors often skew the results.


    Rep. Renacci among top ten richest lawmakers
    A northeast Ohio lawmaker is the only Ohioan to make the list of the top ten richest members of Congress. 

    The Hill newspaper says Wadsworth Republican Jim Renacci is worth nearly $36 million. Renaccir founded a company that owns and operates nursing homes.

    The list includes seven Democrats and three Republicans.

    At number 10, Renacci’s assests are just one tenth the top lawmaker’s value.  Representative Darrell Issa, a California Republican, is worth $355 million.


    Woman says gun safety teacher shot her too
    An Ohio woman says a gun safety class instructor accused of accidentally shooting a student during a demonstration was involved in another accidental shooting decades ago.

    Cathy Schmelzer tells The Columbus Dispatch Terry Dunlap Sr. wounded her in 1977 when he fired a handgun into the air during a Halloween hayride and the bullet ricocheted.

    Dunlap wasn't charged in that case.

    Authorities haven't decided whether to charge Dunlap for accidentally shooting a student in the arm during a gun safety class August 10.

     
    Afghan massacre defendant had idyllic Ohio childhood  
    An older brother of the U.S. soldier who massacred 16 Afghan civilians last year is telling a military jury about what his sibling was like as a youth.

    Bill Bales says Staff Sgt. Robert Bales was an outgoing youngster who served as his high school class president and captain of the football team in Norwood, Ohio, where they grew up.

    The elder Bales is the first defense witness in the case to determine if his brother should receive life in prison with the possibility of parole, or without it.

    He also recalled their late father's struggles with alcohol, and his fervent religious belief.

    Bales, a native of Ohio, pleaded guilty in June in a deal to avoid the death penalty for the solo pre-dawn attacks on two villages in March 2012.


    Body on Ohio Interstate hit several times
    Police say it appears several vehicles drove over the body of a woman found dead on a major highway in Ohio's capital city.

    Travelers reported the body in the middle of the road early Wednesday morning on Interstate 71 north of downtown Columbus. That prompted police to close several miles of northbound I-71 during the morning commute.

    Columbus police said the woman's identity was unknown as of midday Wednesday. No further details about her or her cause of death were immediately released.

    It also wasn't clear how the woman died. A dispatcher told The Columbus Dispatch that officers were investigating whether the woman had died before being hit by a vehicle.


    Doctors ponder cause of Mingo's bruised lung
    Rookie linebaker Barkevious Mingo will likely miss the Browns Sept 8th season opener after thoracic surgeons took a look at his bruised lung.

    Mingo told them he doesn't recall a hit to the chest Thursday against Detroit, but he was spitting up blood after the game. 

    That has team doctors worried. They say Mingo could be out for months.


    Indians sweep Angles in Anaheim
    The Indians beat the Angels, 3-1, to complete a three-game sweep at Angel Stadium.

    Justin Masterson held the Angels scoreless through five innings. He reached the seventh with a 2-1 lead.

    It was the Indians' first three-game sweep in Anaheim since August of 1999.

    The Tribe is 69-58 this season, winning one more game than they did all last year.

    The Indians head back home Friday to start a three-series against the Twins.

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