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Seymour Avenue home of Ariel Castro demolished
Other headlines: Voters reject school levies and sewer issue in August election; Quarterly losses at FirstEnergy, Diebold, and Parker Hannifin
by WKSU's JEFF ST. CLAIR


Reporter / Host
Jeff St. Clair
 
  • Voters reject school levies and sewer issue in August election
  • Quarterly losses at FirstEnergy, Diebold, and Parker Hannifin
  • Summer slump in Ohio casinos’ revenue
  • Food aid set to expire for 1.8 million Ohioans
  • State extends efforts to fight human trafficking
  • Cement plant worker dies in silo accident
  • Seymour Avenue home of Ariel Castro demolished
    One of the women held captive for a decade inside a house in Cleveland has returned to the site on the day of its demolition.

    Michelle Knight released yellow balloons this morning at the house of Ariel Castro as a tribute to missing women. 

    Family members of former captive Gina DeJesus are joining TV crews and city officials this morning as a backhoe begins tearing down the Seymour Avenue structure.

    The Cleveland Land Bank is coordinating the demolition and says material will be shredded and pulverized.

    Castro was sentenced last week to life in prison plus 1,000 years as part of a deal that spared him a possible death sentence.

     

    Voters reject school levies and sewer issue in August election
    A handful of voters narrowly rejected a school levy renewal in the Cleveland suburb of Brooklyn.  The 7.8 mill, 5-year levy failed by 9 votes yesterday.

    School officials say they will try again in November to avoid drastic cuts at the district.

    A renewal for Medina County’s Cloverleaf district passed, but an additional 8.3 emergency levy failed.

    Voters in Portage County’s Field school district  defeated an added 5.5-mill tax.

    In Norton a contentious issue surrounding a controversial sewer project in the city and how future public works projects are funded was defeated.  Issue 1 failed by 117 votes Tuesday. 

     

    Quarterly losses at FirstEnergy, Diebold, and Parker Hannifin 
    It was a disappointing quarter for several local businesses.  

    FirstEnergy reported a $164 million second quarter loss yesterday. The company characterized it as a one-time event tied to expenses related to the closing of older, coal-fired power plants. 

    FirstEnergy also announced it will reduce staff and cut benefits for some workers.  The Plain Dealer reports the Akron-based utility will lay off 70 of its corporate support staff and leave 180 open positions unfilled. 

    North Canton’s Diebold also reported a loss and staff cuts. Diebold is offering early retirement to 1,200 U.S. employees and freezing pensions. 

    The maker of automated teller machines lost nearly $99 million in the second quarter.  New CEO Andy Mattes says the company’s “earnings will continue to be under pressure” for the next couple of years as it invests in new IT infrastructure. 

    And Cleveland-based Parker Hannifin reported Tuesday that its quarterly income dropped 10 percent, hampered by higher-than-expected acquisition costs. 

    A company spokesman says Parker is planning to restructure some of its global holdings. 

     

    Summer slump in Ohio casinos’ revenue
    The latest revenue numbers for Ohio's four casinos are expected to show whether the facilities' summer slump continued in July.

    The revenue totals for last month will be released Wednesday by the Ohio Casino Control Commission.

    The Horseshoe Cincinnati was down the most in June at 10 percent and was hurt by lower revenue from both slot machines and table games. The casinos in Columbus, Toledo and Cleveland also saw their revenues dip.

    Casino revenues statewide in June were $68.6 million, the lowest total in the four full months with all four Ohio casinos open. The statewide total dropped nearly 5 percent from May to June.

    The voter-approved casinos began opening last year under a plan meant to create jobs and spur development.

     

    Food aid set to expire for 1.8 million Ohioans
    About 1.8 million Ohioans who get food stamps will see a reduction in benefits when a federal program expires later this year.

    And a new report says that will be devastating to the people who use the program.

    Federal food assistance was expanded in 2009 as part of the economic-stimulus. That increase will expire at the end of October for the 47 million Americans using food stamps.

    The Center for Budget and Policy Priorities says 16 percent of Ohioans would see nutrition assistance cut by a total of $193 million through September 2014.

    For a family of three, that means $29 less per month.


    State extends efforts to fight human trafficking
    The state is partnering with children's advocacy centers across Ohio to help young victims of human trafficking.

    State officials say the Ohio Network of Children's Advocacy Centers will get more than $523,000 in state funding over the next two years to respond to the needs of human trafficking victims and their families.

    Ohio's Department of Job and Family Services said Tuesday that the 26 children's advocacy centers will use the money to provide medical screenings, forensic interviews and other services, including trauma-focused mental health care. The money also will go toward training, conducting workshops on human trafficking and identifying community resources.

    Professionals at the centers already respond to cases of child abuse. They work in multidisciplinary teams that include child protective services, law enforcement, the local prosecutor's office and others.


    Cement plant worker dies in silo accident
    A southwest Ohio cement plant worker has died after becoming trapped in a silo full of fly ash.

    Authorities said 42-year-old Tim Taylor died Tuesday night from asphyxiation, about four hours after he was overwhelmed by some 8,000 pounds of fly ash — a substance used to make cement.

    It happened at Central Ready Mix in Middletown, between Dayton and Cincinnati.

    It's not clear how he became trapped. Taylor was doing some work in the container, which is about 80 feet tall and was nearly full.

    Taylor was the second man this week to die after becoming trapped in a silo in Butler County. A man died Monday after becoming trapped in a farm silo.

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