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Education


Ohio Senate budget increases school funding
Other headlines: Chiropractors could make the call on concussions;Workers' Comp won't pay for mental injuries; Abused alligator could mean cruelty charges
by WKSU's JEFF ST. CLAIR


Reporter / Host
Jeff St. Clair
 

Senate budget increases school funding
State lawmakers continue to tweak the two-year state budget ahead of a June 30th deadline. The Senate Finance Committee plans today to accept its latest changes to the more than $61 billion, two-year spending plan. Majority Republicans want to boost state spending on K-12 education by more than $717 million compared to the current budget.

Schools would see an additional $140 million in direct state aid under the Senate plan, compared with the funding formula the House passed in its version of the budget. Senators have already pulled what's left of Gov. John Kasich's proposed income tax cut in favor of tax relief for small businesses. The full Senate could vote on the budget by the end of this week, then send it to committee to merge with the House version

Chiropractors could make the call on concussions
A provision in a bill being considered by the Ohio Senate would allow chiropractors to make the call on allowing student athletes with head injuries to go back into games. The move has upset some physicians in the state who say chiropractors do not have the proper training for that responsibility.

The provision is included in a bill likely to be passed Thursday. It gives chiropractors the authority to return young athletes to the field after showing symptoms of a concussion or head injury. 

Workers' Comp won't pay for mental injuries 
The Ohio Supreme Court ruled today that workers’ compensation payments won’t cover treatment for a mental injury that doesn’t result directly from an on-the-job physical injury. The ruling is based on the case of a truck driver injured in an accident who also suffered from PTSD from the traumatic event.  The Bureau of Workers Comp initially approved the PTSD claim, but the owner of the trucking company appealed that decision. The high court agreed with a lower court ruling that workers’ comp will not cover mental injuries that aren’t caused by physical injuries. A dissenting opinion writes that the court missed an opportunity to right a wrong in the area of workers’ compensation law. 

Abused alligator could mean cruelty charges
Authorities say animal cruelty charges may be filed against an Ohio man who was keeping a 7-foot alligator in his basement. The Humane Society removed the reptile from the man's home in suburban Dayton on Sunday after getting a tip about mistreatment. Local officials said the alligator was not being kept in proper conditions and was not on a proper diet. Its growth is stunted for its age, and it is showing other signs of deteriorating health. The alligator will be moved to a refuge in Florida. The owner's name hasn't been released.

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