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Morning news headlines for April 26, 2013
New youth sports concussion law takes effect; Man accused of dumping drilling waste denied operating permit; GOP chairman candidate says disagreement led to back taxes
by WKSU's AMANDA RABINOWITZ


Morning Edition Host
Amanda Rabinowitz
 
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  • New youth sports concussion law takes effect today
  • Man accused of dumping drilling waste denied request to keep operating permit
  • GOP chairman candidate Borges says disagreement caused back taxes
  • Amber Alerts will still come to your cell phone 24/7
  • Former lesbian den mother pressuring Boy Scouts to reinstate her
  • Ohio University investigating suspicious white powder in envelope
  • Investigation reveals misuse of Department of Health computers
  • Parents of 11 year old prosecuted for rape sue for false imprisonment
  • New youth sports concussion law takes effect today
    An Ohio law taking effect today requires coaches, volunteers and officials in youth sports organizations to have players who show concussion-like symptoms sit out games or practices until they're checked and cleared by a doctor or licensed health care provider. The law also requires that coaches know more about concussions and how to spot warning signs and that parents review and sign information sheets about brain injuries. The law also prohibits student athletes from returning to games or practices the same day they're taken out with concussion-like symptoms. Lawmakers previously corrected a bill-writing error that inadvertently imposed criminal penalties for violating the law. 

    Man accused of dumping drilling waste denied request to keep operating permit
    A Youngstown businessman who’s accused of flushing thousands of gallons of drilling waste down a storm sewer has been denied a request to keep his operating permit. Ben Lupo wanted the Ohio Oil and Gas Commission to allow him to keep operating his salt water injection wells while he appeals a permit suspension. Lupo is charged with violating the Federal Clean Water Act for allegedly ordering an employee to dump drilling waste into a Youngstown storm sewer that flowed into a tributary and then into the Mahoning River, triggering a massive cleanup. 

    GOP chairman candidate Borges says disagreement caused back taxes
    A contender for Ohio Republican Party chairman says his disagreement with the government over what taxes he owed led him to rack up years of back debt, not a lack of money. GOP Executive Director Matthew Borges says he withheld years of tax payments to prevent the money from going toward a 2007 tax lien related to a home sale that he was disputing. Borges says once that disagreement was resolved he was able to pay about $25,000 in state taxes from personal funds. He says he paid nearly $125,000 in federal tax liens Thursday. Several Republican state officials say they weren't aware of his tax liens before backing Borges for chairman. He was working to resolve the debts before today’s vote.

    Amber Alerts will still come to your cell phone 24/7
    Amber Alerts will still be coming to your cell phone at all hours of the night. The Ohio Amber Alert Steering Committee said Thursday it will resume the alerts of missing children and other emergencies whenever they occur. The move reverses a temporary halt to having alerts sent between midnight and 6 a.m. to cell phones programmed to receive them because some people complained. The committee says there have been only two state Amber alerts through the Wireless Emergency Alert program since it came online in December. The emergency alert program is in most smart phones. It also sounds alerts for severe weather and urgent messages from the White House. Users can disable the program.

    Former lesbian den mother pressuring Boy Scouts to reinstate her
    The former Ohio Cub Scout den mother who was fired for being a lesbian is pressuring the Boy Scouts to reinstate her. The Boy Scouts of America recently proposed a resolution to end the ban on gay scouts.  But Jennifer Tyrell of rural Bridgeport in Southeast Ohio is gathering signatures for a petition that urges the Scouts to end its ban on gay leaders and parents. Tyrell says that the Boy Scouts’ stance is a confusing one for current members as well as people who want to join. The national organization will vote on lifting the ban of gay scouts next month.

    Ohio University investigating suspicious white powder in envelope
    Ohio University is investigating a white powdery substance in an envelope received by a university employee that forced the evacuation of a bank and campus office. The university says the employee who opened the envelope Thursday has been released from the hospital and the area where the envelope was received is barricaded. The university says the FBI is investigating with help from campus police and an Ohio National Guard weapons of mass destruction team from Rickenbacker Air Force Base in Columbus.

    Investigation reveals misuse of Department of Health computers
    A state investigation has found that some employees at the state Department of Health improperly use state-issued computers and software. Thursday's report detailing the investigation says some employees in the Health Department's Center of Creative Services improperly downloaded state-owned software for personal use and failed to install security upgrades in state computers. The Health Department says it has corrected the security weaknesses, has new protocols in place and is exploring whether to take any other administrative action.

    Parents of 11 year old prosecuted for rape sue for false imprisonment
    A northeastern Ohio police department says it will fight "erroneous allegations" in a malicious-prosecution lawsuit involving an 11-year-old girl who was prosecuted for rape. The girl's parents filed the $5 million lawsuit against the city of Canfield, some of its police officers and a Mahoning County prosecutor this week in federal court. The action claims the couple's daughter was falsely imprisoned and maliciously prosecuted after three other girls claimed she raped them in 2012. She later was acquitted. The lawsuit says one of the accusers recanted and gave officers information "that showed the three accusers conspired to fabricate their allegation." The Canfield Police Department says in statement that its officers acted appropriately in the case.

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