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Noon news headlines for April 17, 201
Kent State president announces retirement; Arrest reportedly made in McDonald's employee shooting; Ohio's top oil and gas regulator goes to D.C.
by WKSU's AMANDA RABINOWITZ


Morning Edition Host
Amanda Rabinowitz
 

Kent State president announces retirement
Kent State University's president plans to retire next year. Sixty-six-year-old Lester Lefton announced his retirement plans Wednesday, effective July 1, 2014. He became Kent State's president in 2006. During his tenure, Kent State enrollment has grown 25 percent to more than 42,000, and the university launched a $200 million campus improvement project. While he was president, Kent State set a record with a $265 million fundraising drive and acquired a college of podiatric medicine located in Independence near Cleveland.

Arrest reportedly made in McDonald's employee shooting
The Beacon Journal reports an arrest has been made in the murder of a McDonald’s employee in Akron. Twenty-one-year old Johnn Lewis of Akron was arrested last night on murder and aggravated robbery charges. He’s being held in the Summit County Jail.  He is accused of shooting 28-year old John Lehman while Lehman taking out the trash at the west Akron restaurant earlier this month. Prayer vigils have been held and there had been a $10,000 reward offered.

Ohio's top oil and gas regulator goes to D.C.
Ohio's top oil and gas regulator is in Washington to endorse state rather than federal oversight of fracking and the disposal of wastewater from drilling. Rick Simmers, chief of the state's Division of Oil and Gas Resources, told The Associated Press he'll focus his testimony before the U.S. House Natural Resources Committee Wednesday on Ohio's strong regulations and positive track record of enforcement. Ohio, Utah and Texas will be represented. His appearance follows calls last month by a coalition of environmental and community groups for a federal review of Ohio's state-run program. Groups including the Buckeye Forest Council cited recent federal indictments of a Youngstown-area businessman and his employee for alleged illegal dumping of oil and gas waste, and a series of earthquakes near Youngstown among their concerns.

More accusations in Steubenville rape
The lawyer for a 16-year-old girl raped by two Ohio high school football players is disputing a prosecutor's account that the girl's father initially wanted the investigation dropped. Attorney Bob Fitzsimmons says the family was taking time to consider the effects of an investigation on their daughter, including the possibility of her testifying publicly. Fitzsimmons, of Wheeling, W.Va., says the family cooperated with police throughout. A judge found the two boys guilty last month and sentenced them to the state juvenile detention system. Jefferson County Prosecutor Jane Hanlin on Wednesday stood by her remarks earlier this week that the family did not want to move forward initially. She says hesitation on the part of sexual assault victims and their families is common and understandable.

DeWine helps law enforcement regulate internet cafes
Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine has created an internal unit to help police officers and prosecutors investigate illegal gambling at storefront gambling-like operations known as Internet cafes. DeWine, long a critic of the businesses' operations and their lack of regulation, says a recent state appeals court decision made it clear the cafes are conducting illegal gambling. DeWine used a news conference Wednesday to once again press lawmakers to pass a bill regulating the cafes, calling the approach he's been forced to take "the hard way." The cafes' status has been the subject of intense lobbying in Columbus, with the Ohio House voting last month to approve a crackdown on the operations. Backers of the cafes say they are legal and help the economy.


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