News Home
Quick Bites
News Archive
News Channel
Special Features
On AirNewsClassical
School Closings
WKSU Support
Funding for WKSU is made possible in part through support from the following businesses and organizations.

The Holden Arboretum

Akron General

Don Drumm Studios

For more information on how your company or organization can support WKSU, download the WKSU Media Kit.

(WKSU Media Kit PDF icon )

Donate Your Vehicle to WKSU

Programs Schedule Make A Pledge Member BenefitsFAQ/HelpContact Us

Morning news headlines for December 4, 2012
Jackson awaits results of Cleveland police shooting investigation; Mandel rehires campaign staffers; Appeals court closes payday lender law loophole

Morning Edition Host
Amanda Rabinowitz
Download (WKSU Only)
  • Jackson taking wait and see approach on police shooting
  • Mandel rehires campaign staffers to the treasurer’s office
  • Appeals court strikes down payday lending law loophole
  • Deer kills down during Ohio hunting season
  • Lordstown GM plant shutting down a week early
  • Historical society unveils founding documents curriculum
  • Judge: Humane Society of the United States can challenge exotic animal law
  • Jackson taking wait and see approach on police shooting
    Cleveland's mayor says he will back police in the shooting deaths of two people during a chase if procedures were followed, but there will be consequences if they weren't. The comments from Mayor Frank Jackson on Monday came as city hall deals with the fallout from Thursday night's shooting barrage of nearly 140 bullets that killed two people. 13 officers were placed on paid leave. No weapon or shell casings were found in the vehicle in which Timothy Russell and Malissa Williams fled downtown Cleveland after an officer heard a gunshot near police headquarters. The medical examiner said Monday that the victims were tested for gunpowder residue, but results could take weeks. Officers say the driver rammed a patrol car and nearly hit an officer.

    Mandel rehires campaign staffers to the treasurer’s office
    Ohio Treasurer Josh Mandel has rehired several staffers from his unsuccessful run for US Senate. The Dayton Daily News reports Mandel re-hired his campaign political director Joe Aquilino as new deputy director of regional representatives - a job that pays 90-thosuand dollars a year. Jared Borg, Mandel’s Senate campaign political coordinator is the treasury’s new deputy director of regional representatives - a job that pays about $62,000 a year.  During the heated race, Democratic Senator Sherrod Brown criticized Mandel for hiring friends and cronies. A Mandel spokesman said in a statement Monday that the treasurer has quote – great confidence in the staff he employs in the office and the work that they do on behalf of taxpayers across Ohio.

    Appeals court strikes down payday lending law loophole
    A state appeals court says payday lenders cannot get around caps on interest rates by using the state’s mortgage lending law. The 9th District Court of Appeals sided with a Lorain magistrate in rejecting what amounted to an annual interest rate of nearly 250 percent. State law has capped rates on “payday,” loans at 28 percent since 2008. The parent company of Cashland had claimed that its mortgage lending license exempted it from the cap. The case is expected to be appealed to the Ohio Supreme Court.

    Deer kills down during Ohio hunting season
    Ohio hunters bagged fewer deer during this past week’s gun season. The nearly 90-thousand deer was down nearly four percent from the 2011 total. State wildlife officials say the harvest is down because of the state’s efforts to reduce the statewide herd by expanding hunting opportunities.

    Lordstown GM plant shutting down a week early
    General Motors’ Lordstown plant will shut down one week ahead of its regularly scheduled holiday break. Officials say the move is to help Chevy Cruze inventory heading into an expected slow period for compact car sales. Sales of the Cruze were up 27 percent in November, aided by car purchases following Superstorm Sandy.

    Historical society unveils founding documents curriculum
    The Ohio Historical Society is unveiling an educational program to help schools comply with a new state law requiring that students in grades 4-12 be taught the original texts of the state and U.S. constitutions, the Declaration of Independence and other documents. The Founding of America Documents Program launches in January. Through a grant, educators will have free access to relevant chapters of an online textbook and to professional development webinars meant to help them teach the topic.

    Judge: Humane Society of the United States can challenge exotic animal law
    A judge has ruled in favor of allowing the Humane Society of the United States to join the state in defending Ohio's new law regulating exotic animals. Four owners filed a lawsuit last month, contending the restrictions threaten their First Amendment and property rights. The Humane Society argued it has a significant interest in defending the law that it strongly supported.


    Add Your Comment


    E-mail: (not published, only used to contact you about your comment)


    Page Options

    Print this page

    E-Mail this page / Send mp3

    Share on Facebook

    Stories with Recent Comments

    Local club works to bring back the once-prevalent American elm
    I would love to help! Where would I get some of the new Strain so I could plant them?

    Ohio Rep. John Boccieri sworn into office and hopes to look for 'middle ground' with colleagues
    Welcome back to the Statehouse, John. You are a terrific representative in the truest sense always representing the people's voice in teh district you serve. ...

    Lawmakers call for indefinite freeze on Green Energy standards
    It's a shame the Hudson Rep. Chooses to mimic the words of the extreme right senator on his way out to join ALEC when we know the Pope was just here because of...

    Youngstown Schools file suit against the Ohio Department of Education to stop the implementation of an academic distress commission
    Voters should ask WHY this plan was rushed into law under the cover of darkness. What clues point to the beneficiaries of this plan? Both Patrick O'Donnell of...

    Great Lakes conference considers a range of threats
    Your article states "Studies discovered over half of all PAHs found in the Great Lakes region come from a single source: Coal tar sealants.". I'm curious to whi...

    ODOT awards Kent-based Davey Research Group nearly $50,000 to improve highway landscapes
    This is an outrageous waste of taxpayer's money. Good for only Davey Tree and their cronies in the State government. It takes $50k to figure out the way to save...

    Canton: another Northeast Ohio city is planning its comeback
    Historic Ridgewood and the Stark Metropolitan Housing Authority have no seats at the table. Very flawed right out of the gate. Ridgewood pays a huge percentage...

    Property owners oppose a wind farm in Northern Ohio
    Here is a link, exposing the connivance of the fossil fuel industry, in trying to prevent us from moving away from their outdated, filthy, and expensive forms o...

    A new industry in Ohio aims to repurpose river sediment
    and where do those PCB's end up??the story never says

    A safe space: How Northeast Ohio colleges try to fight sexual assault
    Very good and thorough job on a very sensitive topic!

    Copyright © 2015 WKSU Public Radio, All Rights Reserved.

    In Partnership With:

    NPR PRI Kent State University

    listen in windows media format listen in realplayer format Car Talk Hosts: Tom & Ray Magliozzi Fresh Air Host: Terry Gross A Service of Kent State University 89.7 WKSU | NPR.Classical.Other smart stuff. NPR Senior Correspondent: Noah Adams Living on Earth Host: Steve Curwood 89.7 WKSU | NPR.Classical.Other smart stuff. A Service of Kent State University