News
News Home
Quick Bites
Exploradio
News Archive
News Channel
Special Features
NPR
nowplaying
On AirNewsClassical
Loading...
  
School Closings
WKSU Support
Funding for WKSU is made possible in part through support from the following businesses and organizations.

Northeast Ohio Medical University

Meaden & Moore


For more information on how your company or organization can support WKSU, download the WKSU Media Kit.

(WKSU Media Kit PDF icon )


Donate Your Vehicle to WKSU

Programs Schedule Make A Pledge Member BenefitsFAQ/HelpContact Us
Social Issues




The next generation enters a sizzling cuisine scene
Tri-C Culinary Arts program has doubled in three years
by WKSU's VIVIAN GOODMAN
This story is part of a special series.


Reporter
Vivian Goodman
 
Nalita Wallace hopes to become a pastry chef.
Courtesy of Zachary Duvall
Download (WKSU Only)
In The Region:
Cleveland’s restaurant revolution promises to be more than a flash in the pan because there’s no shortage of fresh talent downtown. On Public Square, not far from trendy restaurants on E. 4th Street and Ohio City, culinary students are training to become the next generation of celebrity chefs.
chefs in training

Other options:
Windows Media / MP3 Download (5:30)


(Click image for larger view.)

Nalita Wallace of Euclid is making whipped cream to top the chocolate mousse she made earlier.

Meanwhile, Tiffany Roebuck of Cleveland stirs her sauce for boneless, skinless chicken breasts.

She’s decided to serve it over a bed of homemade pasta.

 Ky-wai Wong is the instructor this morning in the Cuyahoga Community College Culinary Arts program.  A veteran Cleveland chef, Wong’s seen enrollment double to 300 students in the three years he’s been part of the faculty.

Designed to help them get into the industry

 “I was at Lockkeepers, Lucky’s Café down in Tremont, and also the old Classics in the Intercontinental Hotel. The way I teach is how I worked in the industry. So it’s very realistic and students appreciate that.”  

The school’s location and décor are designed to help students transition into the industry, says Wong.

 “The kitchens are professional. I mean you notice there’s a lot of stainless steel, tile floors. Students, if they get acclimated to here, stepping into an industry kitchen's not going to be a big leap.”

On this Saturday morning  he has 10 students working in pairs.

Tricks of the trade

 “Each team is working on a different cooking method. We have sauté, broil, blanch, fry, braise, and the students are doing recipes that pertain to that cooking method.”

 “We’re going to reduce some veal stock very quickly, so I’m going to show Nancy one of the tricks is to use a large saucepan. Because it has more of a surface area, it’s going to reduce much faster. In about five minutes, it’ll be nice and syrupy.”

 Nancy Noonan of Cleveland completed a course in dietetics at Tri-C and decided to return for a culinary-arts degree.

"What you learn here is they break down the techniques of cooking so you learn the correct, the proper way to do it.”

Also learning how to run a kitchen

She’s learning the business end, too.

“Yes. Because the class here now is a practical class, like the labs and everything. You also have part of the curriculum is the business side where you learn cost control. You learn purchasing.” 

Wong says the popularity of the program is not surprising.

“Cooking is so popular now.  I think the food shows on television, the media coverage, and also as far as like chefs they’ve gone from being more in the back of the house in the periphery, now they are at the forefront, they’re celebrities.”

Stepping stones

Nancy Noonan hopes to graduate soon but isn’t sure of her next step.

 “I’ve worked in institutional cooking in hospital kitchens and things like that for the last few years so whether I go back to that or, Cleveland has such an exciting restaurant scene going on right now I would love to be able to be part of that as well. And the school brings in chefs from all over the place so you get exposed to the professionals who are already out there doing it. So it’s been great.” 

So are Nancy’s homemade potato chips, says her teacher. 

 “Oh my gosh! And they’re still warm. Nothing beats it.”

For a close-up look at culinary art at the Tri-C Hospitality Management Program stop by Cleveland’s Public Square. The kitchen and culinary studios are open for viewing behind wall-to-ceiling windows. And most Tuesdays at noon, visiting chefs give demonstrations.

That’s this week’s Quick Bite. Hop aboard next Friday when we’ll ride the beer train through the Cuyahoga Valley.


Related Links & Resources
Tri-C Culinary Arts Program website

Add Your Comment
Name:

Location:

E-mail: (not published, only used to contact you about your comment)


Comments:




 
Page Options

Print this page

E-Mail this page / Send mp3

Share on Facebook






Stories with Recent Comments

Ohio Supreme Court hears arguments on who should be paid minimum wage
Just a correction for your story: The trial court sided with the owners. The court of appeals sided with the sales reps.

Husted defends the use of "monopoly" in the wording of Issue 3
Jon, Give me a break. Why don't you concentrate your efforts on other issues to make Ohio a better place to live. Your comments about monopolizing the marijuana...

The Sierra Club is launching ads against Ohio's U.S. Sen. Rob Portman
“'I don’t know what the ad’s going to say. But I hope it’s truthful,' said Portman." This from a man who voted "no" last winter on a Senate resolution s...

Ohio Republicans protest the loss of Mt. McKinley
I believe the U.S.gov't. was overstepping its bounds by renaming a mountain that belongs to Alaska. How would we like it if Alaska (or any other state) telling ...

Pluto: University of Akron cuts baseball - should football be next?
remember when akron and Youngstown state were both in the ovc. As a Morehead State fan, made trips to both schools and had a wonderful experience. Played Akron ...

Ohio to aid young adults who age out of foster care
I think it's a great idea. I worked for an at risk high school and it was really sad to see the amount of kids who had no where to go because they had aged out...

Could University Circle developments ripple into East Cleveland?
Outsiders are so far off the beaten path and you all need to attend the meeting being held today 8/31/15 Cleveland Public Library, 1:00 PM. http://44112news.co...

ResponsibleOhio leader says the state is trying to set Issue 3 up for failure
Ohio suppose to believe that a group of investors were united under one cause to legalize marijuana.Once legal they all of sudden turn into 10 different compani...

Terry Pluto: U of A's new athletic director has the toughest job in town
It is a hard sell. The Students do not want to go to the football games and they do not want to pay for the program. They have a lot of student loan debt and t...

Akron considering the future of the B.F. Goodrich smokestacks
This BFGoodrich alumna says, "Thank you, Dave Lieberth!"

Copyright © 2015 WKSU Public Radio, All Rights Reserved.

 
In Partnership With:

NPR PRI Kent State University

listen in windows media format listen in realplayer format Car Talk Hosts: Tom & Ray Magliozzi Fresh Air Host: Terry Gross A Service of Kent State University 89.7 WKSU | NPR.Classical.Other smart stuff. NPR Senior Correspondent: Noah Adams Living on Earth Host: Steve Curwood 89.7 WKSU | NPR.Classical.Other smart stuff. A Service of Kent State University