News
News Home
Quick Bites
Exploradio
News Archive
News Channel
Special Features
NPR
nowplaying
On AirNewsClassical
Loading...
  
School Closings
WKSU Support
Funding for WKSU is made possible in part through support from the following businesses and organizations.

Meaden & Moore

Don Drumm Studios


For more information on how your company or organization can support WKSU, download the WKSU Media Kit.

(WKSU Media Kit PDF icon )


Donate Your Vehicle to WKSU

Programs Schedule Make A Pledge Member BenefitsFAQ/HelpContact Us


Morning news headlines for Election Day, November 6, 2012
Polls open until 7:30 p.m.; Romney to make final stop at Hopkins; Hearing set for provisional ballots
by WKSU's AMANDA RABINOWITZ


Morning Edition Host
Amanda Rabinowitz
 
Download (WKSU Only)
  • After years of campaigning, the polls are open
  • Hearing set to determine how to count provisional ballots
  • Rafferty sentencing delayed until Friday
  • Cuyahoga County government branches ready to assist Board of Elections
  • Judge rejects delay in Hartman execution
  • State help may be available after Sandy
  • Trumbull County wastewater plant suing ODNR
  • Ohio won’t enforce some exotic animal laws for now
  • Cleveland developer Zai pleads guilty to bank fraud
  • After years of campaigning, the polls are open
    It’s now up to voters at the polls today. Election Day hours are 6:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. On the last day of early voting there was a festival atmosphere in at the elections board offices in Cleveland Monday. Music blared and vendors sold political buttons and hot dogs. Jesse Jackson worked the crowd. Hundreds of people were lined up around the corner. For early voting in total, nearly 50,000 Cuyahoga County residents cast ballots in-person, 27,000 in Summit and 12,000 in Stark. Mitt Romney announced last night that he’ll make one last stop in Cleveland today, a noon rally at Cleveland Hopkins International Airport.

    Hearing set to determine how to count provisional ballots
    A federal judge in Columbus has set a hearing for Wednesday morning over the latest fight of how to count provisional ballots in Ohio.  Ohio Secretary of State Jon Husted decided Friday night that voters must fill out the identification section when they ask for a provisional ballot, not poll workers. In some cases, the voters don’t fill out the information completely or correctly, and those votes will be thrown out. Democrats want the federal judge to order that those ballots be counted. Husted spokesman Matthew McClellan says the provisional ballot form is simple to fill out.

    Rafferty sentencing delayed until Friday
    The sentencing of the 17-year-old Summit County boy convicted in the CraigsList killings has been delayed until Friday. Brogan Rafferty was to be sentenced Monday but that was delayed after Summit County prosecutors and defense attorneys could not agree on a deal in which he would testify against his mentor. Rafferty was convicted of helping Richard Beasley lure four men to rural southeast Ohio with phony job postings on CraigsList , then shooting and robbing them. Rafferty faces life in prison with no chance of parole.

    Cuyahoga County government branches ready to assist Board of Elections
    Today, the Board of Elections will have the support of other branches of Cuyahoga County government. To make sure the election goes smoothly, County Executive Ed FitzGerald has put all departments on alert to help if necessary. And the county’s IT department will have stand-by servers if any election computers breakdown.

    Judge rejects delay in Hartman execution
    A federal judge has rejected a condemned killer's request to delay his upcoming execution over allegations that the state continues to deviate from its written execution policies. Death row inmate Brett Hartman of Akron argues that the state altered its procedures during April and September executions. U.S. District Court Judge Gregory Frost said Monday that the changes raised by Hartman don't violate his constitutional rights. Hartman’s execution is set for next week.

    State help may be available after Sandy
    Ohio officials say help may be available for those with uninsured losses from last week's Superstorm Sandy. The Ohio Emergency Management Agency said those with uninsured losses from the storm should contact their local emergency management agency for resources that can help them. FirstEnergy reported about 1,500 homes and businesses in northeastern Ohio were still without power Tuesday, a week after the storm. Most of the outages were in Cleveland and its suburbs. Around 250,000 Ohio electricity customers were left in the dark after high winds from Sandy's outer bands uprooted trees and brought down power lines.

    Trumbull County wastewater plant suing ODNR
    A water treatment company in Trumbull County is suing the Ohio Department of Natural Resources for more than $3.5 million. Patriot Water Treatment was created to treat brine wastewater from oil and gas drilling, which then sends on for processing at the Warren Pollution Control Department. Under former Gov. Ted Strickland’s administration, the Ohio EPA gave Warren a permit to take the treated water. But the Kasich administration withdrew the permit, which forced Patriot to shut down for three months this spring and summer, until Patriot won an appeal at the Ohio Environmental Review Appeals Commission. It says it lost millions of dollars and that the state deliberately hid documents that would have helped its case.

    Ohio won’t enforce some exotic animal laws for now
    An attorney for animal owners who are suing over Ohio's new law regulating exotic wildlife says they've reached an agreement with state officials in the case. The state has agreed not to enforce certain provisions of the law until there's a hearing on the lawsuit. For instance, Ohio officials wouldn't refer owners for prosecution if they don't register their animals. Under the law, owners faced a Monday deadline to register their creatures. Four owners filed a federal lawsuit on Friday against the state's agriculture department and its director. They claim the law threatens their First Amendment and property rights.

    Cleveland developer Zai pleads guilty to bank fraud
    A Cleveland developer has pleaded guilty to bank fraud and other charges and will forfeit nearly $17 million for his part in a fraud scheme that led to the 2010 collapse of a northeast Ohio credit union. Authorities say Eddy Zai of Pepper Pike conspired to submit false loan documents to St. Paul Croatian Federal Credit Union in Eastlake and to pay bribes and kickbacks to get loans for Zai-controlled companies. The scheme led to one of the biggest credit union collapses in US history

     

     

    Add Your Comment
    Name:

    Location:

    E-mail: (not published, only used to contact you about your comment)


    Comments:




     
    Page Options

    Print this page

    E-Mail this page / Send mp3

    Share on Facebook




    Stories with Recent Comments

    Ohio lawmakers propose grants for home construction for disabled people
    We have been trying to have a "Visitability Bill" passed for years. Thanks, Greg

    Lake County crimes may give Trump immigration fodder
    Shoddy reporting at best. "Mixed views" The question that came to my mind was, "How many people did he have to interview to get "mixed views". Do the two peo...

    Ohio's U.S. Sen. Sherrod Brown announces plans to improve Medicare by lowering prescription costs for seniors
    Sounds good. I'm living in Florida to escape the snow. So far it's working. I retired from GM in 2000. Keep pushing for all the working people. In the long run ...

    The tiny town that time, and elections, forgot may go out of existence
    Thank you for this story. I grew up in Limaville, my parents home is there still...unsellable due to the septic/sewer problem. Sometimes I am sorry I left...wis...

    Where Ohio'sJohn Kasich stands in the presidential polls
    We are fans of Gov. Kasich since he served in the House of Representatives. It pleases us to finally see him as the potential President of the United States. We...

    Cleveland hosts the first national Movement for Black Lives conference
    What a wonderful experience this was, So much love and understanding, without all of the other distractions that tend to come with organizing for change, this e...

    Air Force unit gets training and Youngstown gets rid of some eyesores
    Do they have to totally destroy all the beautiful oak and leaded windows, which I am thinking are probably there? Do they just have to destroy them like that? C...

    Jewish challah and Native American fry bread at an Akron cultural exchange
    Each time I saw the young students relate to each other, I got goose bumps. These young students can and hopefully will teach all of us to live and respect eac...

    One of the Cleveland Orchestra's most celebrated musicians bids farewell
    I had the honor of studying with Franklin Cohen in the late 80s and early 90s. He is unparalleled both as a clarinetist and as a musician. His deep personal war...

    Summa's dress code is not 'etched in stone'
    SOME OF THESE POLICIES ARE A COMPLETE JOKE. UNLESS YOU ARE DOING THESE TYPE OF JOBS EVERY DAY, YOU DON'T KNOW WHAT IS COMFORTABLE AND REASONABLE OR NOT. UNLESS ...

    Copyright © 2015 WKSU Public Radio, All Rights Reserved.

     
    In Partnership With:

    NPR PRI Kent State University

    listen in windows media format listen in realplayer format Car Talk Hosts: Tom & Ray Magliozzi Fresh Air Host: Terry Gross A Service of Kent State University 89.7 WKSU | NPR.Classical.Other smart stuff. NPR Senior Correspondent: Noah Adams Living on Earth Host: Steve Curwood 89.7 WKSU | NPR.Classical.Other smart stuff. A Service of Kent State University