News
News Home
Quick Bites
Exploradio
News Archive
News Channel
Special Features
NPR
nowplaying
On AirNewsClassical
Loading...
  
School Closings
WKSU Support
Funding for WKSU is made possible in part through support from the following businesses and organizations.

Don Drumm Studios

Area Agency on Aging 10B, Inc.

Wayside Furniture


For more information on how your company or organization can support WKSU, download the WKSU Media Kit.

(WKSU Media Kit PDF icon )


Donate Your Vehicle to WKSU

Programs Schedule Make A Pledge Member BenefitsFAQ/HelpContact Us
Ohio


Crop yields down, prices up
Fall harvest lets farmers look back on tough growing season
Story by TOM BORGERDING


 
Download (WKSU Only)
In The Region:

Ohio farmers are finishing corn and soybean harvests early this fall. After months of dire predictions, it appears central Ohio was spared the most severe damage from summer drought and heat. From Ohio public radio station WOSU, Tom Borgerding reports crop yields are down, but higher prices are cushioning farmers' balance sheets.

Crop yields down, prices up

Other options:
Windows Media / MP3 Download (2:49)


Ohio’s farmers are finishing corn and soybean harvests early this fall. After months of dire predictions, it appears Central Ohio was spared the most severe damage from summer drought and heat. From Ohio public radio station WOSU, Tom Borgerding reports crop yields are down, but higher prices are cushioning farmers’ balance sheets.

--------- 
(Ambient combine)

By mid-morning, after the dew has begun burning off, Madison County farmer Dave Siebold climbs into his eight row combine Today, he’s harvesting a 130 acre corn field just south of West Jefferson....he likes what he does.

(Siebold Yep) 
“Yep, done it my whole life, grew up farming’”

Siebold keeps close watch as ripe cornstalks feed into the huge machine. It leaves stubble in the field and collects tons of valuable corn in the bin behind the cab. Siebold says this field fared better than most during the past hot, dry summer. He thanks a single, timely thunderstorm in early August that came at the critical pollination point for his corn

(Siebold yields)

“Right here is this field, they had some rain. Yields are averaging 165 to 170 here. Closer, on the other side of West Jeff where I live, yields were closer to 90 to 100 bushels.

Siebold says the worst corn yield he has seen this fall is 80 bushels per acre - half his normal take in a non-drought year.

(fade out ambient here)

Seibold trucks his corn harvest to the Gavillon Grain elevator about five miles away. Manager Micah Mork says while average corn yields in the county are down by more than a third, prices for corn are at or near record highs.

Mork says he’s been paying farmers about 7-50 a bushel , compared to nearly six dollars last harvest season and as low as 3-dollars just three years ago.

Mork says the higher price has prompted more farmers to sell during harvest rather than store their grain until winter or early spring.

(Mork Some Farmers) 
“Lot of guys have been looking at that price. Its hard to stare 7.50 down and not deliver on it....there’s been plenty of guys that have gone to bins..for some of them that’s just their marketing plan. They put it in the bin, they hold it for awhile, then they sell it when they need the money, January through September.”

While the higher prices this fall help make up for lower yields, Ohio State University agricultural economist, Matt Roberts says in some areas further west, the drought damage is extreme and corn yields are as low as 30 bushels per acre.

(Roberts NW OH) 
“In Ohio, especially those ones in northwest Ohio that maybe are seeing 30 percent, 35 percent of their expected yield, they’re not getting prices three times higher. So, clearly their sales are coming in well, well, short of what they expected this year.”

But, Roberts expects few farmer bankruptcies this fall. He says farmers entered 2012 with strong balance sheets....and

(Roberts Balance Sheet) 
“because farmers now are taking crop insurance. We’re not going to have the widespread losses we’ve had in previous droughts.”

Roberts says federally-subsidized crop insurance has grown especially popular among corn and soybean farmers as a way to manage risks like floods, hail storms, and drought.

Add Your Comment
Name:

Location:

E-mail: (not published, only used to contact you about your comment)


Comments:




 
Page Options

Print this page

E-Mail this page / Send mp3

Share on Facebook



Stories with Recent Comments

Lordstown GM plant plans to install 8,500 solar panels
How much will this solar array cost? How is it being funded, and who is really paying for it? How much real useful electricity will it actually produce in MEh p...

Local Ebola concerns cause officials to pay more attention to West Africa
I have a better idea, let's secure our borders and spend those billions of dollars on our own first.

HUD and Cuyahoga Land Bank extend a housing deal for another year
Need to sale lot, and would like to know how to contact someone to see if they may be interested in the property that sat between two lots. If you can give me...

Akron Beacon Journal details abuse claims against televangelist Angley
In the early 90's I went forth for pray. And the man was anointed by the hand of God. Just a fact I will never forget

Lawmaker questions why a million voters didn't get absentee applications
He's a damn lie! I vote n all elections. I missed 1. Haven't gotten my absentee ballot and their making it hard to get one.

Thirsty Dog Brewery warns it might have to leave Akron
Why is it the city's responsibility to find this guy a location? There are a hundred realestate companies that could help him.

Kent State sends home three after contact with second Ebola-stricken nurse
Why weren't all health workers who were around Duncan quaranteened for 21 days and tested for Ebola? That's a no-brainer. Why was Vinson allowed to travel right...

New book says Willoughby Coal is haunted...and that's good for business
Would love to see a series of books that would just thrill me. I cannot wait to visit some of the locations. And revisit some of the locations I have already vi...

Cleveland Indians to continue with 'dynamic pricing'
pricing is too high for a family as well as people like me who are on a fixed income. Bleacher seats are cheaper but concessions are rediculous.

Kasich talks about faith, drugs and education -- but never FitzGerald
The idea that you can learn more by talking to a 90 year old person than from a history book is just another example of how the GOP hates education and knowledg...

Copyright © 2014 WKSU Public Radio, All Rights Reserved.

 
In Partnership With:

NPR PRI Kent State University

listen in windows media format listen in realplayer format Car Talk Hosts: Tom & Ray Magliozzi Fresh Air Host: Terry Gross A Service of Kent State University 89.7 WKSU | NPR.Classical.Other smart stuff. NPR Senior Correspondent: Noah Adams Living on Earth Host: Steve Curwood 89.7 WKSU | NPR.Classical.Other smart stuff. A Service of Kent State University