News
News Home
Quick Bites
Exploradio
News Archive
News Channel
Special Features
NPR
nowplaying
On AirNewsClassical
Loading...
  
School Closings
WKSU Support
Funding for WKSU is made possible in part through support from the following businesses and organizations.

Meaden & Moore

Hennes Paynter Communications

Hospice of the Western Reserve


For more information on how your company or organization can support WKSU, download the WKSU Media Kit.

(WKSU Media Kit PDF icon )


Donate Your Vehicle to WKSU

Programs Schedule Make A Pledge Member BenefitsFAQ/HelpContact Us
Environment


Taking water from state lakes to help save township roads
Eastern Ohio's great reservoirs may be a boon to the drilling boom
by WKSU's TIM RUDELL


Reporter
Tim Rudell
 
Rocking beams dot the valleys and more are on the way
Courtesy of rudell
Download (WKSU Only)
In The Region:
“Over the river and through the woods”…WKSU’s Tim Rudell reports on the process of getting tens of millions of gallons of water to fracking operations across northeast Ohio…and on challenges literally, down the road
Click to listen

Other options:
Windows Media / MP3 Download (3:47)


(Click image for larger view.)

The mournful sound of a gas-well rocking beam creeks north of Bowerston, in Ohio’s Harrison County.  This is lake country: eight thousand square miles of hills and hardwoods, with big reservoirs meandering through the valleys.  Clendening, Piedmnont and a dozen other lakes were built here 75 years ago as the nation’s first whole-watershed flood control system: the Muskingum Watershed Conservancy District.  

The rocking beams came later…and with water soon to come from the lakes, more will be on the way.  

Darrin Lautenschleger of the Muskingum district says that’s because over the next six weeks, the reservoirs will be “drawn down” -- lowered to accommodate the winter and spring runoff-- to prevent flooding.  “At Clendening and Piedmont there will be a combination of seven billion gallons of water that will be released during that time period.”  

And, he says, some of that water will be sold to drillers for “fracking”— blasting high pressure, chemically treated water into underground shale to fracture it and release trapped oil and gas. It’s the technology that’s creating Ohio’s gas and oil boom.

It takes about five million gallons of water to frack one well. Getting that much water, and getting it to the well sites, are challenges for drillers, and for the rural roads to the wells that weren’t built for tanker truck traffic. 

The Muskingum District lakes are near many proposed wells, so water could be sent to those sites via temporary pipe-lines (large diameter flexible tubing).  That would take some burden off the roads, and save repair and reconstruction costs. 

Joe Bauchman is Tuscarawas County’s engineer. He says repairing a back road after it’s damaged by heavy hauling or shoring it up ahead of time to take the load, means significant costs. “In talking to other county engineers we’ve kind of arbitrarily assigned a figure of $200-thousand-dollars a mile.”

Since township roads tend to be the most affected, Ohio’s Association of Township Trustees asked the Muskingum district to sell water to drillers; but only on the condition that the drillers sign a “road use agreement” that assures they will pay for upgrades and repair, and spells out how they’ll operate.  Belle Everett of Tuscrawas County’s Warwick Township is with the association. “Designated routes have to be named and these operators, their truck traffic, has to follow these designated routes.”

Laurie Lloyd is sitting by an astonishing array of brightly colored pumpkins and squash for sale in the front yard of her farm on state Route 212 in the heart of the lake country.  “Honestly, right here, right now, I see more oil trucks than water trucks unless they’re actually going to be drilling.  When they are going to drill a big rig, then you see then you get the big trucks hauling all of the equipment in.”

Up the road in Sherrodsville, Jeff Schmitt is a local insurance man.  He says property damage has not amounted to much yet. “We are getting a few comp claims, where we’ve had a few cracked windshields and those sorts of things.  But as far as collision claims, no we’ve not seen anything so far at all.  It’s been, ‘that water truck threw a rock and broke my windshield’ type of thing.”

The water trucks will go away in most areas fairly quickly; fracking a well takes a few weeks at most.  But, Engineer Bachman says, there may be a long-term cost story. “What sort of traffic are we going to get after the drilling is done.  I understand that there is one completed well in Carroll County.  And that completed well has 25 semi-trailers of liquid coming off of it every day. “

Meanwhile, selling water to drillers will bring the Muskingum Watershed Conservancy District about 50 thousand dollars per fracking job.  Darren Lautenschleger says the money will pay for surface water quality improvements in the 27 county area.  


Related WKSU Stories

Environmental group says that Ohio isn't financially prepared for fracking
Monday, September 24, 2012

Fracking requires about 5 million gallons of water per well
Monday, September 24, 2012

A business EXPO that may help avoid the bust
Wednesday, September 5, 2012

Three non-water ways to frack a well
Thursday, August 23, 2012

Add Your Comment
Name:

Location:

E-mail: (not published, only used to contact you about your comment)


Comments:




 
Page Options

Print this page

E-Mail this page / Send mp3

Share on Facebook




Stories with Recent Comments

Letters from a lost friend: A Beachwood survivor's Holocaust remembrance
What a great story -- and how important it was for both Marlene and her mother to tell it! Thank you.

Akron city council to vote on resolution for hiring ex-offenders
Great as a taxpayer I paid for the police to catch them, the free lawyer, the jail to house them , the food their kids eat the medical for them and all its goin...

5 of 8 rule headed for a vote
this is just another way for kasich to pass the buck and claim that it gives the local districts control. Few schools have enough money because of his cuts. T...

Bill would allow Ohio religious leaders to refuse to do gay marriages
This is just a lot of political posturing. The free exercise clause of the 1st Amendment already protects clergy from being forced by civil authorities to perfo...

Ohio lawmakers want to eliminate background checks, training to carry guns
On the face of this report I don't find the name of the bill or who sponsered it. I will have to google a general bill with this as its content to address it. N...

Ohio lawmaker calls for an investigation into a Dayton women's prison
I was an inmate at DCI and I am so happy that it's being investigated. The staff behavior there is awful unless he/she is your lover. There are more drugs insid...

Ohio's disabled face long waiting list for services
Can we use the Tribble on Disability Care? if so can you send the link to http://voice4thevoiceless.us thank you, Mark J Cleland Sr voice4thevoiceless.us

Treasures rescued from Cleveland's closed Catholic churches
This was found to be a real gift today Good Friday Bless you for your work

Akron mayor says he had reason to fear an "enraged" councilmember
At least we know that York is out sick. Where in the World is Carmen Plusquellic today?

Copyright © 2015 WKSU Public Radio, All Rights Reserved.

 
In Partnership With:

NPR PRI Kent State University

listen in windows media format listen in realplayer format Car Talk Hosts: Tom & Ray Magliozzi Fresh Air Host: Terry Gross A Service of Kent State University 89.7 WKSU | NPR.Classical.Other smart stuff. NPR Senior Correspondent: Noah Adams Living on Earth Host: Steve Curwood 89.7 WKSU | NPR.Classical.Other smart stuff. A Service of Kent State University