News
News Home
Quick Bites
Exploradio
News Archive
News Channel
Special Features
NPR
nowplaying
On AirNewsClassical
Loading...
  
School Closings
WKSU Support
Funding for WKSU is made possible in part through support from the following businesses and organizations.

Area Agency on Aging 10B, Inc.

Knight Foundation

Don Drumm Studios


For more information on how your company or organization can support WKSU, download the WKSU Media Kit.

(WKSU Media Kit PDF icon )


Donate Your Vehicle to WKSU

Programs Schedule Make A Pledge Member BenefitsFAQ/HelpContact Us
Government and Politics




Both parties using different methods to motivate early voters
People are taking advantage of voting and registering to vote in the same week
by WKSU's STATEHOUSE BUREAU CHIEF KAREN KASLER
This story is part of a special series.


Reporter
Karen Kasler
 

Early voting is now underway in Ohio – and the push to get voters to the polls started before dawn.  

Ohio Public Radio’s Karen Kasler reports the campaigns have two different methods in this early voting season with one common goal – getting their voters out in bigger numbers.

Kasler on early voting

Other options:
Windows Media / MP3 Download (3:57)


It was a long night for Bethany Sanders. 

“I have been awake for most of the night, yeah.”

But she wasn’t waiting for a hot new phone or concert tickets. Sanders, who works with the Ohio State Senate Democratic caucus, was camping with several other young Democrats outside Franklin County’s early voting center set up in north Columbus. Most of those are students at Ohio State University, encouraged to be there by the Democratic Party’s campus outreach. Ilhan Dahir from the Columbus suburb of Hilliard and Noel Fisher, who’s originally from Kansas, were excited to be the first two in line to vote once the center door’s opened. 
“We definitely wanted to show how excited we were about the entire process, about the president and that students are out here, we’re engaged and we’re really interested in showing everybody that we’re going to be a major voice in this election.” 

“I’m here because I’m excited to vote. I’m a freshman at Ohio State so this is my first real election and it’s right here at Ground Zero for the presidential election and I am extremely excited to participate in it.”

Democrats held campouts like this across the state, both to raise awareness of the start of early voting and also to encourage voting at the beginning of the early voting period, since there may be no weekend voting later. A federal judge sided with Democrats and ordered the state to allow voting on the last weekend before the election, but that case is still in court. Meanwhile, Republicans weren’t standing in line to vote in big numbers today, but they were still working on their supporters…. 

“Hi, this is Mary. I’m calling with a brief survey. Can Mitt Romney, Paul Ryan and Josh Mandel count on your vote this November?”

Volunteers manned the phones at Romney headquarters in Columbus, reminding voters that don’t have to wait till November and could cast ballots now. Scott Jennings is the Ohio state director of the Romney for President campaign. 

“We actually had vote early rallies in several counties, including Franklin. We had a big crowd in Hamilton. We’ve had one in Cleveland. We’ve got the Romney-Ryan early vote express bus that is going around the state. So we’re actually having early vote events every single day multiple times a day for the duration of October.”

Among those making those calls is Mimi Cohen of Columbus, who says she talked to several people who have a plan to wait till election day to vote. 

“These couples that have a tradition of actually going to the polls that day and voting. That they’re not – they were, some of them were wary of what happened in Florida of the voting by mail. They want to be there that day.”

Sitting next to her is Marty Federico of Columbus. 

“It is quiet enthusiasm but very definitely enthusiasm. And they have definitely got their minds made up.”

In most counties, voters will go to their regular board of elections offices to cast ballots if they don’t want to mail them in. But in a handful of counties, the boards have set up early voting centers. Back at the one in Franklin County, which is in an 80-thousand square foot old department store, spokesman Ben Piscatelli says he thinks all this space might be needed. 

“Well, if past elections are any indication, there will be a lot of excitement early on. Then it will slow down a little bit, then it will build as we get toward election day. At about the halfway point of this first day, we had nearly 700 people show up to vote in person, and that’s almost as many as we had voting the entire first day of absentee voting in 2008. And that was a record turnout.”

This is the so-called golden week, when voters can register and vote on the same day. The Secretary of State sent out nearly 7 million applications for absentee ballots, and local boards have received more than 922-thousand of them. About 30 percent of voters cast ballots early in the presidential election of 2008, and board of elections breakdowns show more Democrats voted early in person, while more Republicans voted early by mail.

Add Your Comment
Name:

Location:

E-mail: (not published, only used to contact you about your comment)


Comments:




 
Page Options

Print this page

E-Mail this page / Send mp3

Share on Facebook





Stories with Recent Comments

Will Ohio's marijuana initiative follow casinos' lead?
We just ask to have marijuana legalized and here comes some nimrod trying to rob us of our rights and make us buy it from some legalized new type DRUG DEALER th...

Fancy dinners from humble beginnings at The Blue Door
Grandma of Chris Miller moved to Florida in a retirement community but I sure miss the Falls and the Blue Door, and the fine service and the true friendship of ...

The Black Keys guitar tech's moment in the spotlight
Nice job, Vivian. It's always nice to hear about the unsung heroes getting their due! Thank you, Chuck Johnston (Full disclosure - I'm a friend of the Carney fa...

A guide for gift-shopping for older Ohians
I'll never be to old for peanut brittle.

Akron's Tuba Christmas: A resounding blast of holiday spirit
Nice piece, Vivian! Looking forward to hearing you move from flute to tuba on Saturday. Love hearing your interviews and this seemed extra special since I kno...

Cleveland Hugo Boss workers are fighting for their jobs again
Bro. Ginard; I support your effert to keep your jobs, I understand all about concesions, I was a Union offical from 1965 until 1991 and the company th...

Asian Carp control could benefit from bill passed by House, heading to the Senate
help me fight the battle against invasive carp by method of harvest

Ohio's Portman supports lifting limits on party political money
If Portman was legitimately concerned about outside groups influence on elections he would have supported the DISCLOSE act. Instead he helped block it being bro...

Study shows trade with China has cost more than 3 million U.S. jobs
I disagree with James Dorn! If we don't change the playing field and make it a fair competition the whole US industry will be weaker and weaker. Eventually all ...

Copyright © 2014 WKSU Public Radio, All Rights Reserved.

 
In Partnership With:

NPR PRI Kent State University

listen in windows media format listen in realplayer format Car Talk Hosts: Tom & Ray Magliozzi Fresh Air Host: Terry Gross A Service of Kent State University 89.7 WKSU | NPR.Classical.Other smart stuff. NPR Senior Correspondent: Noah Adams Living on Earth Host: Steve Curwood 89.7 WKSU | NPR.Classical.Other smart stuff. A Service of Kent State University