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Pluto weighs in on faith on the field
Terry Pluto discusses why Tim Tebow's public displays of faith rub people the wrong way
by WKSU's AMANDA RABINOWITZ


Morning Edition Host
Amanda Rabinowitz
 
Tim Tebow celebrates his 80 yd touchdown pass to beat the Pittsburgh Steelers in the first round of the AFC playoffs. AAron Ontiveroz, The Denver Post
Courtesy of AAron Ontiveroz, The Denver Post
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Denver Broncos quarterback Tim Tebow has become one of the most celebrated and controversial sports figures. He’s led his underdog team to the NFL playoffs with a series of miraculous last-minute wins – including last Sunday against the Steelers. He credits God.

And that’s where the controversy comes in. Since his days at the University of Florida, Tebow has been outspoken in his faith. His signature act of getting down on a knee and praying to celebrate a touchdown is now a pop-culture term: Tebowing.

And now that he’s an NFL star, it’s bringing up a bigger debate. WKSU commentator Terry Pluto talks to Amanda Rabinowitz about Tim Tebow’s public displays of his Christianity.

Terry Pluto on Tim Tebow's public faith displays

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Listener Comments:

Please. Isn't it time we all became adults and rejected the evidence-free -- albeit seductive -- notion that there's all all-powerful, all-knowing god out there in the ether, watching over us, hearing our prayers, a god who doles out his supposed omnipotence with an eyedropper, allowing the Holocaust to occur, children to suffer and die by the tens of thousands from disease and starvation, and myriad wars to rage in which millions have perished, many in his name? What an enviable position god -- sorry, God -- is in. All manner of human and biological atrocities occur and we say, laughably, "God works in mysterious ways." But if something, well, good happens -- a child in peril is rescued or rain comes to allow crops to thrive -- then it's "Praise God." What undiluted nonsense. I realize that believers, like Tim Tebow, really had no choice. The brainwashing begins virtually from the womb. The newborn is whisked over to the baptismal, then at age 3 or 4 or 5, Sunday School begins and the child, wishing to please his/her parents, goes right along with the program. As Christopher Hitchens posited, it's really a form of child abuse. But the result, going on for centuries now, is a fully indoctrinated adult. I wonder how many believers there would be if our first contact with religion came as adults. Get 'em while they're young never had a more chilling application. The grisly upshot, of course, is that religion has been and is the cause of millions of deaths -- from the Crusades, to the Inquisition to the present day when Sunnis and Shi'a murder each other over minor disagreements in Scripture -- and an incalculable amount of human misery. Religion is the worst scourge ever perpetrated on humandkind and we'll all be better off when we entirely and completely shed its oppressive yoke.


Posted by: Paul Facinelli (Avon, Ohio) on January 11, 2012 12:01PM
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