News
News Home
Quick Bites
Exploradio
News Archive
News Channel
Special Features
NPR
nowplaying
On AirNewsClassical
Loading...
  
School Closings
WKSU Support
Funding for WKSU is made possible in part through support from the following businesses and organizations.

Greater Akron Chamber

Area Agency on Aging 10B, Inc.

Akron Children's Hospital


For more information on how your company or organization can support WKSU, download the WKSU Media Kit.

(WKSU Media Kit PDF icon )


Donate Your Vehicle to WKSU

Programs Schedule Make A Pledge Member BenefitsFAQ/HelpContact Us
Arts and Entertainment


Father and son hard hit by the recession fight back with a song
"These Tears Can't Wash Away My Dreams" is about never giving up
by WKSU's VIVIAN GOODMAN


Reporter
Vivian Goodman
 
Chris and Gene Pritchard make music in the living room. It's a family tradition.
Courtesy of Vivian Goodman
Download (WKSU Only)
Fathers and sons working together is nothing new. Fathers and sons being unemployed together is not uncommon either these days. But in Bay Village, an advertising executive with nothing to advertise, and a hiring specialist with no one to hire, are re-inventing themselves as a songwriting team, and redefining their relationship as father and son.
Click to Listen

Other options:
Windows Media / MP3 Download (9:06)


Thinkin' When You're Drinkin'

Other options:
Windows Media / MP3 Download (3:35)


I Can't Do It

Other options:
Windows Media / MP3 Download (4:10)


Tears Can't Wash Away My Dreams

Other options:
Windows Media / MP3 Download (3:13)


Old jobs gone, father and son create new works together

Audio version by Vivian Goodman
Text version by Holly Schoenstein
 
                Careers, relationships and illness have come and gone, but the love that father and son Gene and Chris Pritchard share has endured.
The unyielding economy stripped Gene, a former advertising executive, and Chris, a human resources recruiter, of the jobs they held for decades. 
“Things are bad enough in my business that I don’t even pick up the phone and look for a job,” said Chris, of Bay Village. “I’m figuring my career in consulting is certainly over for the immediate future, more likely forever.”
                But that doesn’t mean the pair is done. Their new careers? Songwriting. Their new colleagues? Each other.     
Chris, now 58, was 11 when his parents’ divorced, but he has fond memories of when they were together.
“My mom and dad were always listening to Nat King Cole and Andy Williams and dancing in the living room, and we would always sing in the car, songs like ‘Hi Lily Hi Low,’” Chris said. “I don’t know if you know that one, but it’s a beautiful melody, and Dad would sing that.”
Chris plays the guitar while Gene sings. Gene writes the lyrics, Chris the melodies. They’ve written 16 songs together in the last year. 
“Maybe one a week there for a while,” Gene said. “It was like a floodgate opened up for me. I don’t know. It was just fun and thrilling. I thought, ‘Geez I can write songs. It’s like taking candy. It’s so enjoyable.’ ”
Though the economy can be blamed for many problems, the Pritchards say it has inspired their latest effort, “Tears Can’t Wash Away my Dreams.” 
                “The layoffs come.
 The plants close down.
 Till it’s damn near killed this old town.
                 But these tears can’t wash away my dreams.”
Gene Pritchard’s experience writing ads has trained him to think in short blurbs – the kind of thinking that translates well into song lyrics.  
“I’m sort of headline-oriented,” he said. “A line comes into my head, and I thought, ‘Geez, “Tears Can’t Wash Away my Dreams.” That’s a recession story.’ Somebody whose job is going away and home being repossessed, his truck’s being towed out of the driveway, but he’s still not going to give up. Something that I have put onto my kids that my Dad gave to me, that you never give up.”
The recession story is well and personally known by the Pritchard family. Gene was in the publishing business for 50 years, 25 of them running his own consulting business. His enterprise was doing well, he said, until the recession hit last year.
Chris was a headhunter for General Electric, Ernst & Young and Coopers & Lybrand. He even wrote a book, “101 Strategies for Recruiting Success.” Most recently he was the vice president of recruiting for National City Bank.
“I’m one of the world’s better-known recruiting experts at a time when no one’s recruiting or hiring,” he said.
So these days, Chris has been living out of a suitcase and looking for work. He has two children, two grandchildren and another on the way. 
“But tears can’t wash away my dreams, either,” he laughed. 
The business collapse led to the Pritchard’s formal stab at songwriting. But it’s not the only musical inspiration.
Gene wrote his first love song last year, a few days before Valentine’s Day.
“After 17 years, I think I’m more in love with my wife than I ever was before,” Gene said. “So, suddenly, a line popped into my mind, which was ‘A Minute’s an Hour When Love’s on my Mind.’ … I’m lying in bed, and I’ve never written a song or a poem before in my life, and I thought that would make a song.”
He e-mailed the lyrics to Chris, who put them to music. A few days later he sent more. A year after that they had enough songs to fill an album or two.
                It’s no surprise that two people from a musically centered family would try to make a go of their talents. Each of Gene’s four sons and two daughters plays instruments.
Gene now prefers to write and sing songs rather than play instruments. He said he was “mediocre to barely good at the clarinet, and I had a saxophone. I always loved music. I’m a guy who wishes he was a musician all his life, but I haven’t been. I just appreciate it.”
Chris had a Mickey Mouse guitar when he was a toddler and got his first real guitar on his 11th birthday. 
He began writing love songs. One of Gene’s friends owned a recording studio in Texas, and when Chris was 14, he took him there for his first recording session.”
“It was absolutely a thrill, and my voice hadn’t changed yet,” Chris said.
Chris got a publishing contract with Vanguard Records and has played guitar professionally in bands and clubs.
“I worked my way through grad school playing guitar at night at one too many Holiday Inns, singing feelings five times a night or whatever was popular,” he said. 
But when he married and had kids, he gave up the dream of being a professional musician. “I really made a choice that I didn’t want to be an absentee Dad.”
When Gene looks back on Chris’s decision, he has mixed feelings.
“In a way I’m sad about it because I know what great talent he has. I’m sad in that way but proud of what he’s done, and he’s a heck of a lot better father than I ever was,” he said.
Gene was a hard-driving, work-a-holic ad man when his kids were growing up.
But now that he’s 78, things are different. 
Earlier this year, Gene had a cancer scare.
“They ended up taking out the little tumor and a small piece of my lung around it, and they said, ‘You’re gonna be fine,’” Gene said. “And I feel wonderful. But it was a little scary.”
But Chris said Dad had a more aggressive form of cancer than he let on.
“But in any case, the irony of writing a song about when everything’s hitting the fan, to keep hope alive, that message at this particular time in Dad’s health certainly wasn’t lost on me,” Chris said.
This father-and-son duo says the songwriting – and hard times it commemorates -- have strengthened their bond.
“Chris and I are very close, but this has taken it another step further in terms of really understanding a little bit more about our lives,” Gene said. “Since I write most of the lyrics, he’s getting pretty deep into mine. Maybe more than I’m getting into his.”
Listener Comments:

Great interview! May all sorts of doors open for you two.


Posted by: Adelaide Revnyak (North Olmsted, OH) on June 22, 2009 2:43PM
Enjoyable interview. Definitely a reflection of a
God-blessed "father-son bonding". Your lyrics resinated ... the melodies lifted my spirit!
Continued blessings in your gift(s) as you share them with us. YES, and we want MORE...


Posted by: Barb and Kurt Musser (Fleming Island, Florida) on June 18, 2009 5:37PM
What a terrific story. Great job guys. Please let me know if you cut a CD, I'd be pleased to have it in my collection.


Posted by: Jerry McMahon (Scottsdale, AZ) on June 18, 2009 1:52PM
Great interview. Listening to the real story of song writing and the loving dad-son duo gave me goosebumps.


Posted by: Ginny Smallenburg (Avon Lake OH) on June 18, 2009 10:29AM
Enjoyable,feel good,easy listening music. I also enjoyed the "downhome" heartwarming story.


Posted by: June Pritchard (Ashtabula, Ohio) on June 18, 2009 10:06AM
Wonderful, engaging interview, Vivian! Thank you so much.


Posted by: Gayle Pritchard (Bay Village, OHIO) on June 18, 2009 8:20AM
Add Your Comment
Name:

Location:

E-mail: (not published, only used to contact you about your comment)


Comments:




 
Page Options

Print this page

E-Mail this page / Send mp3

Share on Facebook





Stories with Recent Comments

Lordstown GM plant plans to install 8,500 solar panels
How much will this solar array cost? How is it being funded, and who is really paying for it? How much real useful electricity will it actually produce in MEh p...

Local Ebola concerns cause officials to pay more attention to West Africa
I have a better idea, let's secure our borders and spend those billions of dollars on our own first.

HUD and Cuyahoga Land Bank extend a housing deal for another year
Need to sale lot, and would like to know how to contact someone to see if they may be interested in the property that sat between two lots. If you can give me...

Akron Beacon Journal details abuse claims against televangelist Angley
In the early 90's I went forth for pray. And the man was anointed by the hand of God. Just a fact I will never forget

Lawmaker questions why a million voters didn't get absentee applications
He's a damn lie! I vote n all elections. I missed 1. Haven't gotten my absentee ballot and their making it hard to get one.

Thirsty Dog Brewery warns it might have to leave Akron
Why is it the city's responsibility to find this guy a location? There are a hundred realestate companies that could help him.

Kent State sends home three after contact with second Ebola-stricken nurse
Why weren't all health workers who were around Duncan quaranteened for 21 days and tested for Ebola? That's a no-brainer. Why was Vinson allowed to travel right...

New book says Willoughby Coal is haunted...and that's good for business
Would love to see a series of books that would just thrill me. I cannot wait to visit some of the locations. And revisit some of the locations I have already vi...

Cleveland Indians to continue with 'dynamic pricing'
pricing is too high for a family as well as people like me who are on a fixed income. Bleacher seats are cheaper but concessions are rediculous.

Kasich talks about faith, drugs and education -- but never FitzGerald
The idea that you can learn more by talking to a 90 year old person than from a history book is just another example of how the GOP hates education and knowledg...

Copyright © 2014 WKSU Public Radio, All Rights Reserved.

 
In Partnership With:

NPR PRI Kent State University

listen in windows media format listen in realplayer format Car Talk Hosts: Tom & Ray Magliozzi Fresh Air Host: Terry Gross A Service of Kent State University 89.7 WKSU | NPR.Classical.Other smart stuff. NPR Senior Correspondent: Noah Adams Living on Earth Host: Steve Curwood 89.7 WKSU | NPR.Classical.Other smart stuff. A Service of Kent State University