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July 31, 2014
What’s On Now?

The World






Also Playing Now:

 WKSU News:
The World
 WKSU Classical:
Classical Music with Julie Amacher



Later Today On WKSU

4:00
All Things Considered®



6:00
Marketplace®

The award-winning daily program about business and finance puts a human face on the global economy, with insight from anchor Kai Ryssdal.

6:30
All Things Considered®



7:00
Q with Jian Ghomeshi

"Q" is Canada's liveliest arts, culture and entertainment magazine. It's a smart and surprising tour through personalities and cultural issues that matter.

What’s On Now?

The World






Also Playing Now:

 WKSU On Air:
The World
 WKSU Classical:
Classical Music with Julie Amacher



Later Today On WKSU's News Channel

4:00
All Things Considered®



6:00
Marketplace®

The award-winning daily program about business and finance puts a human face on the global economy, with insight from anchor Kai Ryssdal.

6:30
All Things Considered®



7:00
Q with Jian Ghomeshi

"Q" is Canada's liveliest arts, culture and entertainment magazine. It's a smart and surprising tour through personalities and cultural issues that matter.

What’s Playing Now?

Classical Music
With Julie Amacher

3:21
Joseph Horowitz and Michael Beckerman: Hiawatha Melodrama (after Dvorak): Hiawatha's Wooing (PostClassical Ensemble)


3:33
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart: Symphony No. 25 (Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra)



Also Playing Now:

 WKSU On Air:
The World
 WKSU News:
The World



Later Today On WKSU's Classical Channel

4:00
Classical Music with Mindy Ratner



8:00
Classical Music with Mark Pennell

Join WKSU’s Mark Pennell for the best in classical music.



Friday On WKSU Classical

12:00
Classical Music



5:00
Classical Music with Ward Jacobson



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888-957-WKSU (888-957-8897) to share your story.

Life since May 4, 1970: students, towns-people and guardsmen
For some, the day changed everything. For others, life moved on


Full story



Dean Kahler has energy for basketball and political change -- but not for anger
The most severely wounded of the nine students, Kahler says he became an icon for some -- for better and worse.


Full story



A town torn by the controversy
Businesses and residents leaned on each other to try to recover


Full story



Professor turns fear into change
May 4th inspired Dolores Knoll to lead gay rights movement at Kent State


Full story



KSU holds nearly two dozen May 4th memorial events
Vigils, walking tours, dedications held


Full story



1970: A year when America was polarized on many levels
Kent State shootings illustrate the animosity of the time


Full story



Reconciliation and peace through poetry
The Kent State Wick Poetry Center and School of Visual Communication Design's Glyphix Studios work with school children and senior citizens to create Peace Stanzas


Full story



New evidence in 40 year-old cold case at Kent State
Audio analyst says there were gunshots before guard opened fire


Full story



Donna Karan's Urban Zen Foundation comes to Kent College Of Nursing
Designer's foundation focuses on self-care for better health care.


Full story



DOJ refuses to re-open 1970 Kent State shooting investigation
The Justice Department says the enhanced recording does not contain any new evidence


Full story



Dean Kahler: visitors' Center helps him move past May 4, 1970
Dean Kahler, among the most severely wounded of the 13 Kent State students shot by the National Guard on May 4, 1970, tours the new May 4th Visitors' Center being dedicated this weekend.


Full story



On May 4th, 1970, Ohio National Guard troops opened fire on Kent State students protesting the invasion of Cambodia, the escalation of the Vietnam War - and the presence of the guard on campus.

Four students died; nine were wounded.

The scene became an icon for the Baby Boom generation. And this year, it was added to the National Register of Historic Places, as a site that contributed significantly to the understanding of the nation's history and culture.

But for many, the history is not national. It's personal. And while it's fading out of many textbooks and memories, it's fresh in the lives of many others.

WKSU is taking a look at the personal stories and larger lessons that grew from May 4, 1970.


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