News
News Home
Quick Bites
Exploradio
News Archive
News Channel
Special Features
NPR
nowplaying
On AirNewsClassical
Loading...
  
School Closings
WKSU Support
Funding for WKSU is made possible in part through support from the following businesses and organizations.

The Holden Arboretum

Lehmans

Akron Children's Hospital


For more information on how your company or organization can support WKSU, download the WKSU Media Kit.

(WKSU Media Kit PDF icon )


Donate Your Vehicle to WKSU

Programs Schedule Make A Pledge Member BenefitsFAQ/HelpContact Us
Social Issues




The aroma of fresh bread fills a northeast Ohio neighbhorhood
Artisan bakery is a labor of love for a former computer programmer and a former art historian
by WKSU's VIVIAN GOODMAN
This story is part of a special series.


Reporter
Vivian Goodman
 
Sabine Macys lived for six years in Italy and never really liked American supermarket bread.
Courtesy of Robert Sustersic
Download (WKSU Only)
In The Region:

The rise of the local foods movement, new small family farms, and a vibrant cuisine scene are key ingredients for a Northeast Ohio bakery. Breadsmith is a chain, but franchisees enjoy a lot of leeway. In today’s Quick Bite we meet a couple of bakers in Lakewood who wrote their own recipe for success.

LISTEN: A corner bakery

Other options:
Windows Media / MP3 Download (6:25)


(Click image for larger view.)

Ginius Macys knows his customers. 

 “We have quite a few people from Romanian background so they really like Italian. We have quite a few Irish people, so Irish soda and rye goes with that. And also quite a few more Slavic, more Russian type they like their ryes, too.” 


Carlos Ramos stops at  Breadsmith every week for his favorite hardy, dense , crusty German  loaf.  He’s been a regular since the bakery began emanating enticing aromas from the corner of Detroit Avenue and Clifton Boulevard nine years ago. 

 “Lakewood was missing a bakery that made fresh bread every day and used really good wholesome ingredients. There are a lot of old world methods that they use that you don’t see anymore.” 

You would think you were in Munich or Paris when Ginius lifts his 10-foot long wooden paddle.

 “A peel. It’s a French word. I can load in 200 loaves at a time.” 

They bake 35 different kinds of bread from scratch every day: French Ciabatta, Rustic Italian, Tuscan Herb, stone ground wheat, dark rye…  a tangy beer bread made with Cleveland Porter from Buckeye Brewing , and Austrian
Pumpernickel, a hearty rye that Sabina Macys claims has just 4 grams of fiber per half-inch slice.

She’s equally proud of her dessert breads.

Our pumpkin chocolate chip bread, which is vegan bread. We have a whole line of vegan sweets as well.  Orange-cranberry, brioche cinnamon swirl which is again a favorite breakfast bread or for French toast. Our rustic Italian, just a basic Italian might be one of our best sellers. We make a Tuscan herb which is kind of a focaccia in loaf form. It's got basil and oregano and thyme and all kinds of good stuff. Our sourdough. Now our sourdough is my husband's baby. He works that thing every single day. You got to feed it every day. It has its own life and sometimes it has its own moods based upon the humidity and the temperature of the day, too. 

Sabine wants us to sample her newest recipe. It’s a 100 percent whole grain bread made with only local ingredients that she calls Homegrown Whole Wheat.

" We get our wheat which is a very specialized kind of wheat called warthog from Breakneck Acres in Ravenna. And there's some oats in there, too and that comes from Stutzman which is in Holmes County. And of course local honey helps if you have allergies and that kind of thing.  We are a peanut-free facility. We have no high fructose corn syrup, No transfats.”

It’s a cosy place, redolent with the fragrance  of freshly baked bread. There’s one table where  you can sit and have a cup of coffee with a muffin or a chocolate chip cookie.  

And Sabine treats everyone like family.

Sabine’s parents were from Germany and Ginius’ family came to Cleveland from Lithuania. They each lived for a while in Europe and neither has ever liked American supermarket bread.

"You look at that chemistry set of ingredients, let alone not having a real crust. Yeah. It didn't seem like real bread to me."  

Ginius grew up baking in his Mother’s kitchen on East 185th Street. But there were other good options in his neighborhood.

“We used to go to one Italian market to get our rolls and then another market to get our rye and this was all within 3 or 4 blocks of each other. Those shops are no longer there.” 

Breadsmith of  Lakewood  supplies several restaurants, including Georgetown, Players, Joe’s Deli , Angelo’s Pizzeria,  and Tartine’s and vegan and vegetarian breads for Sweet Melissa’s in Berea. 

They also donate bread every night to food pantries and homeless shelters.  

Sabine and Ginius Macys have won Cleveland Magazine’s Best Place to Buy Bread silver spoon  award for two years running. 

They open the door to their corner bakery every weekday morning at 7, rest on Mondays.  And on Sunday they open at 8. 

And that’s this week’s Quick Bite.

 Next week we talk with veteran Cleveland restauranteur Brad Friedlander , owner of Moxie and Red, about his plan to open another upscale steakhouse downtown.


Related Links & Resources
Breadsmith of Lakewood website

Listener Comments:

Vivian, I look forward to your Quick Bites every week. Each time, you make me want to rush right out to the place you have visited. Not possible, or I might sometimes do it.
Thanks. Elizabeth
P.S. I live near Silver Creek Farm that used to be CSA, and still supplies some things to good markets.


Posted by: Elizabeth Allyn Hendricks (Hiram Twp.) on October 2, 2012 11:10AM
Add Your Comment
Name:

Location:

E-mail: (not published, only used to contact you about your comment)


Comments:




 
Page Options

Print this page

E-Mail this page / Send mp3

Share on Facebook






Stories with Recent Comments

Ohio becomes first in the nation to dump PARCC testing
Best test to use for elementary schools is the old pre common core Iowa test of basic skills. This test measures apples to apples and tests the skills appropri...

Ohio is moving forward with new standardized tests
Mr Chow, Nice piece on testing. Should not Ohio go to an open bid process for the new assessment contract? Ohio has stayed with a "connected" DC non-profit fo...

The Surpreme Court gay-marriage decision plays out in Ohio Amish country
Keep in mind that the majority of the people residing in Holmes County are Amish, a church people who do not vote because they do not believe in governmental ru...

Akron council committee recommends Forney for its opening
Which committee member voted for Wilhite?

Nearly a dozen Cuyahoga gay couples get licenses to marry after the Supreme Court ruling
Presiding Judge Anthony J. Russo a graduate of Chanel High School and supposed member of St. Francis Parish in Gates Mills has just excommunicated himself. As ...

Canton Youth Symphony is named orchestra of the year
This is what makes CSO the hippest small town orchestra in America!

What can be expected if Ohio's tobacco taxes increase?
let's face it! The increase has little to do with smoking cessation

Rare Cleveland Indians photo from 1911 hits the auction block
Paddy Livingston, who cut his teeth on a Louisville Slugger in Kent, Ohio was one of the immortals that played in that game. He was the catcher. Ty Cobb actuall...

Nexus denies Green's request to relocate its planned gas pipeline
These people have so much power. Too much. They could care less about the people they leave when it is done. Spectra does not, and admits, they do not do the...

Copyright © 2015 WKSU Public Radio, All Rights Reserved.

 
In Partnership With:

NPR PRI Kent State University

listen in windows media format listen in realplayer format Car Talk Hosts: Tom & Ray Magliozzi Fresh Air Host: Terry Gross A Service of Kent State University 89.7 WKSU | NPR.Classical.Other smart stuff. NPR Senior Correspondent: Noah Adams Living on Earth Host: Steve Curwood 89.7 WKSU | NPR.Classical.Other smart stuff. A Service of Kent State University