News
News Home
Quick Bites
Exploradio
News Archive
News Channel
Special Features
NPR
nowplaying
On AirNewsClassical
Loading...
  
School Closings
WKSU Support
Funding for WKSU is made possible in part through support from the following businesses and organizations.

Akron Children's Hospital

Greater Akron Chamber


For more information on how your company or organization can support WKSU, download the WKSU Media Kit.

(WKSU Media Kit PDF icon )


Donate Your Vehicle to WKSU

Programs Schedule Make A Pledge Member BenefitsFAQ/HelpContact Us
Social Issues




Quick Bites: Getting a taste of local honey
Wildflower honey, honey jam, hickory syrup and more
by WKSU's VIVIAN GOODMAN
This story is part of a special series.


Reporter
Vivian Goodman
 
Courtesy of Valerie Brown
Download (WKSU Only)
In The Region:

One of the sweetest treats at Northeast Ohio’s farmers’ markets is produced by the region's own very industrious bees.   The National Honey Board has a website where health-conscious consumers can locate home-grown honey.  But for this week’s “Quick Bite”, WKSU’s Vivian Goodman had to look no further than Bath.

Taste of honey

Other options:
Windows Media / MP3 Download (4:54)


(Click image for larger view.)

You can find local honey at Shaker Square’s Indoor Market, Mentor’s Krizman Farmers Market, and at Lake Farmpark in Kirtland.

Today, we’re at the Countryside Conservancy’s Farmer’s Market at Old Trail School in Bath talking with  a couple of local beekeepers.

 “Hi, I’m Susan Schmidt of Schmidt Family Farms. But people call me the honey lady.”

Schmidt farms in Medina County.

Daniel Greenfield brings his honey to market from his farm in Peninsula. 

“Greenfield Berry Farm.  Yeah, I’m the beekeeper. And we have about five hives. They produced about 250 pounds of honey this year. They forage a lot of course at the berry farm, and so the honey is influenced by the berries themselves.

Over the years recently we’ve heard some scary stuff about bees. How’s it going lately?

“Bees, like other things in agriculture, they have a tough time of it. So they’re susceptible to mites, and there are a lot of problems with this climate. We don’t have the big problems of colony collapse, at least that I know of. But there are definitely some challenges that go with beekeeping.”

The Schmidt family had raised organic vegetables, flowers, herbs and eggs for many years at their farm about 25 miles south of Cleveland. Then an Ohio State University Extension service agent put a bug in Susan Schmidt’s head about bee-keeping. 

 “There’s a wonderful workshop called the Tri-County Beekeepers Association workshop, and it was the next week. So when the extension agent told us, I went down to the workshop and learned all about beekeeping.”  :

That was about 15 years, and a lot of beestings ago.

You wouldn’t know it though, when you see her.  And customers make a beeline when they do.  

Schmidt says her bees don’t mind the weather.

 “ In the winter, the bees stay inside their hive. They stay in a cluster, in a ball, and they wiggle their little wing muscles which generates so much heat that it stays warm and they keep the queen warm in the middle of the cluster. They don’t hibernate. How many hives have you got there? Well, I keep 10 on my properties and I rent hives from somebody else. Probably 60 right now.”  

Her bees forage all spring and summer on acres of wildflowers, and she extracts honey from the hives once a year

 “Anywhere from, 40 to 80 pounds a hive, generally speaking. How many different varieties of honey are you offering here? Just one variety of honey.  But I’m making something called the honey jam, which is nothing but honey and crystallized fruit. At our house, it doesn’t make it to your toast.” 

Beth Knorr, manager of the countryside conservancy’s farmer’s market, suggests another way to top your toast, from Daniel Greenfield’s farm.

 “One of my favorite products of his is hickory syrup. We don’t have anybody else bringing hickory syrup. It’s got a nice smoky flavor and it’s great on pancakes and in baked goods, too. It’s a really great change-up from maple syrup every now and then. I know my kids would probably drink the whole bottle if I let them.”  

 “ How do you make syrup hickory flavor?

“Hickory syrup’s a little different in that we take the bark of the shagbark hickory tree and we boil that and steep that for a long period of time. We reduce that with honey and sugar till it’s just the right consistency and it’s quite delicious. Did you invent this? No, I know others are doing it as well. Amish down in Southern Ohio are doing it and also I know some folks in Indiana as well.”

Greenfield sells his honey and syrup here at the Countryside Conservancy Farmers Market and at his berry farm in Peninsula. Both the Greenfield Berry Farm and the Schmidt Family farm also have community-supported agriculture programs.  Customers help defray some of the costs by coming to the farms once a week throughout the growing season to pick up produce.

Visitors  to the Schmidt Family Farm enjoy the wildflowers almost as much as the bees do.    

 “We have 50 acres and I do certified organic vegetables on about an acre of it. It must be beautiful as well. Yes, it is. I love it.”

The next time you can forage at the Countryside Conservancy’s Farmer’s Market will be a week from Saturday.

Next Friday on Quick Bites, we’ll tour the market to give you a preview. 


Related Links & Resources
The Greenfield Berry Farm website

Schmidt Family Farm profile

Add Your Comment
Name:

Location:

E-mail: (not published, only used to contact you about your comment)


Comments:




 
Page Options

Print this page

E-Mail this page / Send mp3

Share on Facebook






Stories with Recent Comments

Terry Pluto: U of A's new athletic director has the toughest job in town
It is a hard sell. The Students do not want to go to the football games and they do not want to pay for the program. They have a lot of student loan debt and t...

Akron considering the future of the B.F. Goodrich smokestacks
This BFGoodrich alumna says, "Thank you, Dave Lieberth!"

State creates panel to look at Ohio charter school sponsors
It is more than disturbing that charter schools, which seemed like a good idea years ago, have begun to cripple public school education.

DEVO mural in Akron is now on display downtown
The installation is not at the former site of Chili Dog Mac. CDM was one block north on the other side of Main St.

New report shows growth in white collar jobs for Northeast Ohio
Unfortunately, there are fewer jobs in comparison to the number of professionals applying for them. I have been had a full time job since June 2012. In order to...

Advocacy group: Ohio could lead in clean energy
Ohio Legislators, You are supposed to be our leaders but you're not taking us where we want to go - where we need to go!

Campaign for and against marijuana legalization begins
Cannabis legalization needs to happen as soon as possible! But not if it gives monopolies to a selected few to grow and sell the herb. Responsible Ohio's mono...

Heinen's in downtown Cleveland sponsors a contest for food entrepreneurs
Love that this took place right here! What a way to support local. Thank you Heinens! Love this quote, as a small local biz, I agree, it's big!! "To be a small...

Pluto: How the Indians' blockbuster deal went bust
Terry, As a long time reader of yours I am generally on the same page - and we're also about the same age. Anyway, like many, I am dismayed at the greedy and en...

Copyright © 2015 WKSU Public Radio, All Rights Reserved.

 
In Partnership With:

NPR PRI Kent State University

listen in windows media format listen in realplayer format Car Talk Hosts: Tom & Ray Magliozzi Fresh Air Host: Terry Gross A Service of Kent State University 89.7 WKSU | NPR.Classical.Other smart stuff. NPR Senior Correspondent: Noah Adams Living on Earth Host: Steve Curwood 89.7 WKSU | NPR.Classical.Other smart stuff. A Service of Kent State University